Donor States 2019

Balance of payments is the amount of revenue paid to the federal government from a state’s residents and economy (taxes) minus the amount of federal spending in that state. Donor states are states that pay more to the federal government in taxes than they receive back in funding.

There are currently 10 US states that are considered donor states. The main reason that these states see a negative balance is because they have some of the highest household incomes in the country, paying more to federal taxes. This, however, does not guarantee that they would receive more federal funding for things such as Medicaid and education.

Connecticut is the state with the largest negative balance of payments. This means that the gap between what Connecticut pays in taxes and what they receive from the federal government is large, and they receive much less than what they paid. Connecticut’s negative balance is $4,000 per capita and residents are only receiving 74 cents in return for every dollar sent to the federal government.

Following Connecticut is New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts, all with negative balance of payments in the thousands. Each state is also seeing small returns on their dollar, with New Jersey at 82 cents, New York at 86 cents, and Massachusetts at 83 cents.

Virginia is at the opposite end of the spectrum, with the highest positive balance of payments. Virginia’s balance of payments is $10,301, and residents receive $1.97 for every dollar sent to the federal government.

California, known for having high taxes, is not currently a donor state, but the positive balance of payments is only $12. Therefore, taxpayers in California are receiving an average of $12 more from the federal government than they pay in taxes to it.

The ten donor states with the largest negative balance of payments per capita (the biggest givers) are:

The ten states with the largest positive balance of payments per capita (the biggest takers) are:

Rank State 2019 Pop. 2019 Growth
1California39,747,2670.48%
2Texas29,087,0701.34%
3Florida21,646,1551.63%
4New York19,491,339-0.26%
5Pennsylvania12,813,9690.05%
6Illinois12,700,381-0.32%
7Ohio11,718,5680.25%
8Georgia10,627,7671.03%
9North Carolina10,497,7411.10%
10Michigan10,020,4720.25%
11New Jersey8,922,5470.16%
12Virginia8,571,9460.64%
13Washington7,666,3431.74%
14Arizona7,275,0701.44%
15Massachusetts6,939,3730.54%
16Tennessee6,833,7930.94%
17Indiana6,718,6160.40%
18Missouri6,147,8610.35%
19Maryland6,062,9170.33%
20Wisconsin5,832,6610.33%
21Colorado5,770,5451.32%
22Minnesota5,655,9250.80%
23South Carolina5,147,1111.24%
24Alabama4,898,2460.21%
25Louisiana4,652,581-0.16%
26Kentucky4,484,0470.35%
27Oregon4,245,9011.32%
28Oklahoma3,948,9500.15%
29Connecticut3,567,871-0.13%
30Utah3,221,6101.91%
31Iowa3,167,9970.38%
32Puerto Rico3,113,659-2.55%
33Nevada3,087,0251.73%
34Arkansas3,026,4120.42%
35Mississippi2,987,8950.05%
36Kansas2,910,931-0.02%
37New Mexico2,096,0340.03%
38Nebraska1,940,9190.60%
39West Virginia1,791,951-0.77%
40Idaho1,790,1822.05%
41Hawaii1,416,589-0.27%
42New Hampshire1,363,8520.55%
43Maine1,342,0970.28%
44Montana1,074,5321.15%
45Rhode Island1,056,738-0.05%
46Delaware975,0330.81%
47South Dakota892,6311.18%
48North Dakota760,9000.11%
49Alaska735,720-0.23%
50District of Columbia711,5711.30%
51Vermont627,1800.14%
52Wyoming572,381-0.93%