Homeschool Laws By State 2019

Homeschooling is the education of children at home or another place that is not a school. Homeschooling is typically conducted by a parent, tutor or online teacher.

Homeschooling and education by family members at home was a common practice for many years and in many cultures in the past. It declined in the 19th and 20th centuries as mandatory attendance laws began for schools. In the 1960s and 1970s, homeschooling became popular again as some people became dissatisfied with industrialized education.

Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states, and every state has the freedom to create its own regulations for home education.

Below is a list of all 50 states and their homeschooling laws. Included in this data are how to enroll your child in homeschooling, instructor qualifications, required days of instruction, required subjects to be taught, homeschool records, and testing.

Alabama

  • In Alabama, the Homeschool Law requires you to send an enrollment form to your local education authority containing the names of all of the children you will be homeschooling and their address by the fifth day of the public school year, or before you withdraw your child to begin homeschooling.
  • If your child already attends an Alabama public school, you must first send in an enrollment form to notify the school that you will be homeschooling, and then send an official withdrawal letter.
  • The instructor does not need to meet specific qualifications.
  • You must teach the same number of days as a public school: 180 days per year.
  • There are no specific educational subjects that you are required to teach.
  • You must keep a record of your child’s attendance throughout the year.
  • There is no requirement for homeschool students to participate in testing.

Alaska

  • In Alaska, the Homeschool Law does not require you to notify the school district that you are homeschooling.
  • If your child already attends an Alaska public school, you will need to send a withdrawal form to the school district.
  • The instructor does not need to meet specific qualifications.
  • There is no required number of hours per day or days per year for homeschooling.
  • There are no specific educational subjects that you must teach.
  • You are not required to keep records of your homeschooling.
  • Independent homeschoolers are not required to participate in testing.

Arizona

  • In Arizona, you must file an affidavit of intent with your county school superintendent within 30 days from the time you begin to homeschool. The affidavit must be notarized. Most counties will also need a copy of the child’s birth certificate.
  • If your child is already enrolled in a public school, you will need to send an affidavit of intent and then fill out and send a withdrawal letter to the school.
  • If you move counties, you must send an affidavit of intent for your new county and notify your previous county that you are no longer homeschooling there.
  • The instructor does not need to meet specific qualifications.
  • There is no required number of hours per day or days per year for homeschooling.
  • Arizona requires that you teach five educational subjects: reading, grammar, mathematics, social studies, and science.

Arkansas

  • In Arkansas, you must file a Notice of Intent with the superintendent of your local school district before August 15th of every school year that you homeschool.
  • If your child is already enrolled in a public school, you will need to send a Notice of Intent and then send an official letter of withdrawal to the school.
  • The instructor does not need to meet specific qualifications to homeschool; however, you will not be allowed to homeschool if a sex offender lives in your home.
  • There is no required number of hours per day or days per year for homeschooling.
  • There are no specific educational subjects that you are required to teach.
  • You are not required to keep records of your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

California

  • California has four legal homeschooling options: home-based private school, a private school independent study program, hiring a private tutor or teacher, a public school independent study program.
  • You will first need to decide which type of homeschool option you wish to enroll your child in. Each has a separate procedure to notify the Superintendent of Public Instruction that you will be homeschooling your child. You will then need to submit a withdrawal letter with a specific date that you will be withdrawing your child either by mail or in person.
  • There are specific qualifications for each homeschool education option in California depending on which option you choose.
  • The hours required per day and days required per year depend on the homeschool option you choose.
  • All four homeschool options require seven educational subjects to be taught: English, mathematics, social studies, science, visual and performing arts, health and physical education.
  • Required records and testing regulations depend on which homeschool option you choose for your child.

Colorado

  • Colorado’s Homeschool Law requires that you send a Letter of Intent 14 days before beginning homeschooling every year to notify the school district that you will be homeschooling.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you must send a Letter of Intent 14 days before homeschooling. Some schools have an official withdrawal form.
  • You must be a parent, legal guardian or an adult relative designated by the parent to homeschool a child
  • Colorado Homeschool Law requires that you teach a minimum of 172 days out of the year and an average of 4 hours per day.
  • Colorado requires you to teach your child seven educational subjects: communication skills (reading, writing and speaking), mathematics, history, civics, literature, science, and the United States Constitution
  • You must keep records for each child that you homeschool of attendance, test and evaluation results, and immunization records.
  • Homeschool students in Colorado are required to participate in testing during grades 3,5,7,9, and 11. Your child can either take a national standardized test or be evaluated by a qualified person. The results must be sent to your school district and 13% or higher must be achieved (or be making satisfactory academic progress) to continue homeschooling.

Connecticut

  • The Connecticut Homeschool Law does not require you to notify the school district that you are homeschooling your child. You should fill out a Notice of Intent form within 10 days of beginning to homeschool every year.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you need to send in a withdrawal letter before removing him/her.
  • There are no required qualifications for the instructor.
  • There are no required hours per day or days per year for homeschooling; however, you are asked in your Notice of Intent how many days in the year you will be teaching. An average public school year in Connecticut is 180 days.
  • There are seven required education subjects: reading, writing, spelling, English grammar, geography, arithmetic, and US history and citizenship.
  • There are no required records to be kept for homeschooled students; however, you should keep a portfolio of your child’s education.
  • Homeschooled students are not required to participate in yearly testing.

Delaware

  • The Delaware Homeschool Law requires you to officially open a non-public school through the Department of Education. This is where you will report the enrollment of your student(s) and their attendance information.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you will need to first open a non-public school with the Department of Education and then, once accepted, you will receive an acknowledgment page, which you will bring to the school to withdraw your child.
  • There are no required qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no required hours per day or days per year that a homeschool student needs to attend.
  • You must keep a record of your child’s attendance throughout the year.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in yearly testing.

District of Columbia

  • In Washington DC, you must fill out a Notice of Intent every year you are homeschooling by August 15th (15 days before homeschooling at any time of the year if it is your first year).
  • If you need to withdraw your child, submit a Notification of Intent and then contact the school for any forms needed to officially withdraw.
  • Homeschool instructors must have at least a high school diploma or equivalent.
  • There are no required hours per day or days per year that a homeschool child must receive instruction, but you must provide enough for him/her to academically progress.
  • There are eight required educational subjects: language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, art, music, health, and physical education
  • You are required to keep a portfolio of your child’s work that contains at least a year’s worth of the following materials: writing samples, worksheets, workbooks, creative materials, assessment reports.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in yearly testing. Homeschool students can take the standardized tests in the local school.

Florida

  • In Florida, you must file a notice of intent form with your school district superintendent of the county within 30 days of starting homeschooling. This only needs to be filed one time, and for any child who is 6 years old or older before February 1st.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, submit your Notice of Intent first and then notify your child’s school that you will be withdrawing your child.
  • There are no requirements for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no specific hours per day or days per year that your child needs to be homeschooled.
  • There is no list of required education subjects for homeschooled students.
  • Florida Homeschool Law requires you to maintain a portfolio of records and materials for your child for the superintendent.
  • Homeschool students must be evaluated annually, which can be done in a variety of ways. The results of this evaluation must be documented and an evaluation letter must be sent to your county’s superintendent.

Georgia

  • Georgia homeschool law requires you to file a Declaration of Intent with the Department of Education within 30 days of beginning to homeschool and must be filed every year following before September 1st.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, submit your Declaration of Intent and then notify the school of withdrawal.
  • Homeschool instructors must have at least a high school diploma or GED and you may only teach your own children.
  • Homeschool students must be taught a minimum of 180 days that consist of 4.5 hours of schooling.
  • There are five required education subjects for homeschooled students: reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science.
  • You must make an annual progress assessment report and keep a copy of your Declaration of Intent and your child’s test scores for your homeschool records.
  • Homeschooled students in Georgia must take a national standardized test in grades 3, 6 and 9.

Hawaii

  • Hawaii Homeschool Law requires you to file a Notice of Intent with your public school principle before homeschooling.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, first send your Notice of Intent form and then contact the school to see how you need to withdraw your child.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no required hours per day or days per week for teaching homeschooled students, but you need to keep track of the hours/week that your child is taught.
  • There are eight required subjects for elementary level students: language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, art, music, health, and physical education. There are seven for secondary level students: social studies, English, mathematics, science, health, physical education, guidance.
  • Hawaii requires that you keep a record of the curriculum plan for each homeschool student, as well as a copy of the Notice of Intent, your child’s test scores and samples of the child’s work.
  • Hawaii homeschool students must follow the statewide testing program, requiring each student to test in grades 3, 5, 8, and 10.

Idaho

  • Idaho does not require you to notify your school district if you decide to homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you should contact your school to notify them and ask if they have an official withdrawal form.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that a homeschool student must be taught.
  • There are seven required subjects for homeschool students: language arts and communication, mathematics, science, social studies, fine arts, health, and physical education.
  • Idaho does not require that you keep specific records of your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

Illinois

  • Illinois Homeschool Law does not require you to notify your school district if you decide to homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you will need to send in a withdrawal letter, keep your child home on the day indicated in your letter, and send in a student records quest letter within 10 days of sending your withdrawal letter.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that a homeschool student must be taught.
  • There are six required educational subjects for homeschool students: language arts, mathematics, biological and physical sciences, social sciences, fine arts, physical development, and health.
  • Illinois does not require that you keep specific records of your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

Indiana

  • Indiana Homeschool Law does not require you to notify your school district if you decide to homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child from school, fill out and send a withdrawal letter and keep your child home from school on the date indicated. If withdrawing from a high school the law requires that you meet with the school principal to discuss legal requirements and sign a form.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students must be taught for a minimum of 180 days per year.
  • Homeschool students must be taught “equivalent instruction” to what is taught in public schools, but the parent is left to determine what “equivalent instruction” is.
  • You are required to keep a record of attendance for each homeschooled child.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

Iowa

  • Iowa Homeschool Law does not require you to notify your school district if you decide to homeschool your child.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you need to contact your school to inform them that you are withdrawing your child for homeschooling.
  • There are no specific required qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There is no minimum number of hours per day or days per year that your child must be taught.
  • There are five required educational subjects for homeschooled students: mathematics, reading, language arts, science, and social sciences.
  • Iowa does not require that you keep specific records of your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students in Iowa are not required to participate in testing.

Kansas

  • Kansas Homeschool Law states that you must register your homeschool with the state’s board of education.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you can do so by phone, in person or by letter to officially withdraw them.
  • You must be a “competent instructor” to teach homeschool students, but there is no authority to determine who is “competent” to teach, and there are no specific requirements for instructors in non-accredited schools.
  • Homeschool students must be instructed 186 days/year for 6 hours per day for first grade through 11th grade.
  • There are no required educational subjects for homeschool students.
  • Kansas does not require that you keep specific records of your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students in Kansas are not required to participate in testing.

Kentucky

  • Kentucky Homeschool Law states that you must send a Letter of Intent to the district superintendent 10 days before school begins and send the letter each year that you intend to homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child from school, fill out and send a letter of withdrawal to officially withdraw him/her.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors in Kentucky.
  • Homeschool students must receive a minimum of 185 days of instruction per year.
  • There are eight required subjects for homeschool students, reading, writing, spelling, grammar, history, mathematics, science, and civics.
  • Kentucky requires that a record of attendance, courses, and grades are kept for each homeschool student, and suggests a portfolio of each child’s work.
  • Homeschool students in Kentucky are not required to participate in testing.

Louisiana

  • Louisiana Homeschool Law states that you must submit a Home Study Application to the Department of Education within 15 days of beginning to homeschool. Every year, you must re-apply by October 1st or within 12 months of your first application.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, do so before starting homeschooling by filling out and send a withdrawal letter to the school.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students must receive a minimum of 180 days of instruction per year.
  • You must teach your homeschool student a “sustained curriculum of quality at least equal to that offered in public schools at the same grade level” (LA Rev Stat § 17:236.1).
  • There are no required records to be kept for each homeschooled child; however, you have to option to submit a portfolio for each homeschool child with your re-application every year to show achievement and progress.
  • Louisiana requires each homeschooled student to participate in annual testing, such as a competency exam, a standardized test, or a statement from a certified teacher.

Maine

  • Maine Homeschool Law requires you to send a Notice of Intent to your school and commissioner with 10 days of the start of homeschooling. Every following year, you must submit another Notice of Intent by September 1st and submit an assessment of your child’s progress.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you must officially do so by sending a withdrawal letter to your school.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students must receive 175 days of instruction per year.
  • Maine requires you to teach 11 required subjects: English, language arts, math, science, social studies, physical education, health education, library skills, fine arts, Maine studies, and computer proficiency.
  • Maine requires that you keep copies of your original Notice of Intent and every year-end assessment for your child.
  • Maine requires each homeschool student to participate in yearly testing or assessment, which can be a standardized test, one developed for school officials, or a review done by a certified teacher.

Maryland

  • Maryland Homeschool Law requires you to submit a Homeschool Notification Form to your superintendent 15 days before beginning to homeschool. You must notify your school of your intent to continue homeschooling every year.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, contact your school by letter, e-mail or in-person to officially withdraw your child.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors in Maryland.
  • Homeschool students must be taught a minimum of as many hours as needed for the students to meet the standard achievement level of their grade.
  • There are eight required subjects for homeschool students to be taught: English, mathematics, science, social studies, art, music, health, physical education.
  • Maryland requires that you keep a portfolio of each child’s relevant work.
  • At the end of each semester, you must meet with a representative of the school district to review each child’s portfolio. Homeschool students are also allowed (but not required) to participate in standardized testing with the local school.

Massachusetts

  • Massachusetts requires that you get approval from your local school district and may reject your request. You might need to provide your education plan, your qualifications to instruct, your education materials and information on your child’s academic process.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you should send a withdrawal letter before starting homeschooling.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year required for homeschool instruction.
  • There are no required educational subjects for homeschool students, however, local school officials can ask to review your educational materials to determine what you should teach.
  • There are no required records to be kept for homeschool students; however, your school district might ask to see information about your child’s academic process.
  • Massachusetts does not require homeschool students to participate in testing, but your school district can require an assessment or evaluation such as a portfolio review or an assessment by a professional educator.

Michigan

  • Michigan Homeschool Law does not require you to notify your school district of your choice to homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you will need to send the school a withdrawal letter and officially withdraw your child.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year required for homeschooling.
  • There are eight required educational subjects for homeschool students: reading, spelling, mathematics, science, history, civics, literature, writing, and English grammar.
  • There are no required records to be kept for homeschool students.
  • Michigan does not require homeschool students to participate in testing.

Minnesota

  • Minnesota Homeschool Law requires you to report to your local superintendent once a year for every year that you homeschool. After your first year, you must send a Letter of Intent by October 1st every year to continue to homeschool.
  • You must officially withdraw your child from school.
  • Homeschool instructors have to meet one of the following requirements: be a parent of the child; have a valid Minnesota teaching license for the grade level to be taught; be supervised by a licensed teacher; complete a teacher competency exam; teach in an accredited school, or have a baccalaureate degree.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year required for homeschooling.
  • There are 13 educational subjects required for homeschool students: reading, writing, literature, fine arts, mathematics, science, history, geography, economics, government, citizenship, health, and physical education.
  • You must keep records of your child’s class schedules, copies of instruction materials, and descriptions of assessment methods.
  • Minnesota requires that each child is tested/assessed every year. You must report which test your child will take to the superintendent.

Mississippi

  • Mississippi Homeschool Law states that you must submit a certificate of enrollment for each child you homeschool by September 15th every year.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you can do so at any point in the school year and must send a withdrawal letter to the school and contact the county’s attendance officer.
  • There are no qualifications for homeschool instructors except that you must be a parent, guardian or custodian of the child.
  • Homeschool students must be taught for a minimum of 180 days per year.
  • There are no required educational subjects for homeschool students.
  • Mississippi does not require you to keep any records of your child’s homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students in Mississippi are not required to participate in testing.

Missouri

  • Missouri Homeschool Law does not require you to notify the school district that you are homeschooling your child.
  • If your child needs to withdraw fro school, send in a withdrawal letter to your local superintendent.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students must receive 1,000 hours of instruction per year, and at least 600 must be taught teaching the required subjects. 400 of those hours must be at the regular homeschool location.
  • There are five required educational subjects: reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science.
  • Missouri requires that you keep a written record of the subjects you teach, a portfolio of each child’s work, and copies of academic evaluations for each child.
  • Missouri homeschool students are not required to participate in testing, but their academic progress does need to be evaluated.

Montana

  • Montana Homeschool Law requires you to notify your county superintendent each year that you homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, contact your child’s school to see if they have a method for withdrawal.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students must be taught for a minimum of 360 hours for kindergarten, 720 hours for grade 1-3, and 1,080 hours for grades 4-12.
  • Homeschool students are required to learn the basic educational subjects taught in Montana public schools.
  • Montana requires that you keep records of your child’s attendance and immunizations.
  • Montana homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

Nebraska

  • Nebraska Homeschool Law requires you to file for exempt status as a non-accredited school annually by July 15th before homeschooling.
  • You need to officially withdraw your child from school by having an exit interview with the superintendent, sign a notarized release form with the Commissioner of Education and file for exempt status.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students are required to be taught a minimum of 1032 hours per year for elementary students and 1080 hours for high school students.
  • There are five required educational subjects: language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, and health.
  • Nebraska does not require any records to be kept for homeschool students.
  • Nebraska homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

Nevada

  • Nevada Homeschool Law requires you to file a Notice of Intent with the district superintendent to begin homeschooling. This only needs to be filed once unless your situation changes.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, contact your school district and ask if they have a form for you to fill out.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors. You must be the legal parent or guardian of the child being homeschooled.
  • There is no required minimum of hours per day or days per year.
  • There are four required educational subjects: English, social studies, mathematics, and science.
  • Nevada does not require any records to be kept for homeschool students.
  • Nevada homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

New Hampshire

  • New Hampshire Homeschool Law requires you to notify your district superintendent of your homeschooling within 5 business days of starting.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, contact your child’s school to notify them and ask if they have an official form for you to fill out.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors. You must be the legal parent or guardian of the child being homeschooled.
  • There is no required minimum of hours per day or days per year.
  • There are 11 required educational subjects: science, mathematics, language, government, history, health, reading writing, spelling, US and NH constitution and art and music appreciation.
  • Nevada requires you to keep a portfolio of writing samples, worksheets, workbooks and a reading log for each child.
  • Nevada requires each homeschool student to receive an evaluation every year such as a portfolio reviewed by a certified teacher, and National Student Achievement Test, a Student Assessment test or an approved alternative evaluation method.

New Jersey

  • New Jersey Homeschool Law does not require notification to your school district that you are homeschooling.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, notify your child’s school and the district superintendent, and send a withdrawal letter.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no required educational subjects but you should offer equivalent instruction.
  • New Jersey does not require that you keep any specific records for your child.
  • New Jersey homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

New Mexico

  • New Mexico Homeschool Law requires you to notify the state through the New Mexico Public Education Department’s (electronically or by mail) within 30 days of beginning to homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, contact your child’s school to notify them and ask if they have an official form for you to fill out.
  • You must be the legal parent or guardian of each child you homeschool and have a minimum high school diploma or GED.
  • Homeschool students must receive at least 180 days of instructions per year, or 990 hours/year for K-6 or 1,080 hours for 7-12 grade.
  • There are five required educational subjects: reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science.
  • New Mexico requires that you keep records of your child’s immunization record, proof of your qualification, a calendar showing that you meet the minimum day/hour requirements. New Mexico homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

New York

  • New York Homeschool Law requires that you send a Letter of Intent to your school district 14 days after beginning to homeschool. After the first year, this letter must be sent by July 1st. You then will receive, fill out and return an Individual Home Instruction Plan (IHIP) for each child.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, contact your child’s school to notify them and ask if they have an official form for you to fill out.
  • You must be the legal parent or guardian of the child or children you are homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students must be taught for 180 days per year or 900 hours for grade 1-6 and 990 hours for grades 7-12.
  • There are four required education subjects for all grades (plus additional required subjects for elementary, middle school, and high school levels): patriotism and citizenship, health education, highway safety and traffic regulation, and fire and arson prevention safety.
  • New York requires that you keep a record of attendance as well as a copy of your letter of intent, IHIP, quarterly reports for each child, and a copy of your child’s yearly test scores or evaluations.
  • New York homeschool students are required to participate in testing every year. Each child must take an achievement test administered at your local public school or non-public school, or at home, by a professional. Children in grades 1-3 can receive an academic evaluation as an alternative.

North Carolina

  • North Carolina Homeschool Law requires that you send a Notice of Intent to the Department of Non-Public Education, sent after July 1st for the first year of homeschooling. This only needs to be sent in once, and you will need to include a copy of your high school diploma.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send a note with your Notice of Intent and copy of your diploma that says “Priority Handling Request: Child is currently in a year-round school.” Make sure your child attends school until the registration process is complete.
  • Homeschool instructors must have a minimum of a high school diploma or GED.
  • Homeschool students must attend at least 9 months of instruction.
  • There are no specific required educational subjects.
  • North Carolina requires you to keep a record of your child’s attendance, immunization records, and annual test scores.
  • North Carolina homeschool students are required to participate in a nationally standardized test of your choice every year. The test you choose must cover English, reading, spelling, and mathematics.

North Dakota

  • North Dakota Homeschool Law requires you to send a Statement of Intent to your local district’s superintendent 14 days before homeschooling begins.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you should contact your child’s school to officially withdraw them before starting homeschooling. Ask if they have any specific forms for you to fill out.
  • Homeschool instructors must have a high school diploma or GED.
  • Homeschool students must be taught a minimum of 4 hours per day for 175 days per year.
  • Elementary and middle school level students must be taught six educational subjects: English, mathematics, social studies, science, physical education, and health.
  • High school level students must be taught 10 educational subjects: English, mathematics, science, social studies, health, physical education, fine arts, foreign language, career and technical education, and an advanced placement course.
  • You are required to keep yearly records of any courses your child takes, your child’s progress assessment, and your child’s test results.
  • North Dakota homeschool students are required to participate in testing in grades 4, 6, 8, and 10. You can use the test that your local school district uses or request a different national standardized test.

Ohio

  • Ohio Homeschool Law states you must send a Home Education Notification form to your superintendent every year of homeschooling.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, contact your school and ask if they have any forms you need to fill out. This needs to be done before homeschooling your child.
  • Homeschool instructors must have a high school diploma, GED, or standardized test scores that show you have a high school equivalent education.
  • Homeschool students must receive 900 hours of education per year.
  • There are thirteen required educational subjects: language, reading, spelling, writing, geography, history, government, mathematics, science, health, physical education, fine arts, and first aid, safety, and fire prevention.
  • Ohio does not require that you keep any specific records for your child.
  • Ohio homeschool students are required to participate in yearly testing by taking a national standardized test or a written assessment by an authorized person.

Oklahoma

  • Oklahoma Homeschool Law does not require you to notify your school district that you are homeschooling.
  • It is not required that you give any notice or explanation before withdrawing your child, but you should notify the school before keeping your child home.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that homeschool students must attend, but 180 days per year is strongly recommended.
  • There are no required educational subjects, but you are encouraged to teach the same subject taught in public schools.
  • Oklahoma does not require that you keep any specific records for your child.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

Oregon

  • Oregon Homeschool Law requires you to notify your Education Service District (ESD) of your decision to homeschool within 10 days of starting.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send a withdrawal letter to your child’s school to officially withdraw them.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that homeschool students must attend.
  • There are no required educational subjects.
  • Oregon does not require that you keep any specific records for your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in testing during grades 3, 5, 8, and 10. The test must be given by an approved tester and done before August 15th.

Pennsylvania

  • Pennsylvania Homeschool Law requires you to send a notarized affidavit to your superintendent by August 1st every year before you begin homeschooling every year.
  • If you need to withdraw your child from school, you should fill out and send a withdrawal letter to official withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • Homeschool instructors are required to have a high school diploma or GED.
  • Homeschool students are required to attend a minimum of 180 days per year or 900 hours per year for grade K-6 or 990 hours per year for grades 7-12.
  • Grades K-6 have the following required educational subjects: English, arithmetic, science, geography, history, civics, safety, health and physiology, physical education music and art.
  • Grades 7-12 have the following required educational subjects: English, science, geography, social studies, mathematics, art, music, physical education, health, and safety education.
  • Pennsylvania requires that you keep a portfolio and a written academic evaluation for each child.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in testing during grades 3, 5, and 8. They must take a national standardized test.

Rhode Island

  • Rhode Island Homeschool Law requires you to send a Notice of Intent to Homeschool to your school and you must receive approval from a committee before homeschooling.
  • If you need to withdraw your child from school, you should fill out and send a withdrawal letter to official withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students are required to attend a minimum of 180 days per year of instruction.
  • There are eight required educational subjects: reading, writing, geography, arithmetic, history of the US and Rhode Island, civics, health, and physical education.
  • Rhode Island requires you to keep a record of your child’s attendance throughout the year.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in testing.

South Carolina

  • South Carolina Homeschool Law requires you to receive approval from your school district’s Board of Trustees. You can find a homeschool application on your school district’s website.
  • If your child needs to withdraw from school, you will need to register with the school district, and then fill out any paperwork that your school district may have to officially withdraw your child.
  • Homeschool instructors are required to have a high school diploma, GED, or baccalaureate degree.
  • Homeschool students are required to attend at least 4.5 hours per day and 180 days per year of instruction.
  • There are 5 required subjects for grades K-6: reading, writing, mathematics, science, and social studies. Grades 7-12 add composition and literature.
  • South Carolina requires you to keep records of the subjects you teach, a portfolio of your child’s work samples, and a record of evaluations.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in yearly testing and should take the state-approved testing for all public school students.

South Dakota

  • South Dakota Homeschool Law requires you to send an initial Notification for Public School Exemption Certificate to your school district and send an annual one every year.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, you will need to send your school district an Initial Notification for Public School Exemption Certificate and as your child’s school for any specific forms.
  • There are no specific qualifications for homeschool instructors.
  • Homeschool students are required to receive a minimum of 437 hours per year for kindergarten, 875 hours per year for grades 1-5, and 962 hours per year for grades 6-12.
  • There are two required educational subjects: languages arts and mathematics.
  • South Dakota requires you to keep a copy of your child’s birth certificate on record.
  • Homeschool students are required to take a national standardized achievement test in grades 4, 8, and 11.

Tennessee

  • Tennessee Homeschool Law requires you to send a Notice of Intent to Homeschool to your Director of Schools every year.
  • If your child needs to withdraw from school, send in your Notice of Intent and then contact your school to see if there are specific forms for you to complete to officially withdraw.
  • Homeschool instructors must have a high school diploma or GED.
  • Homeschool students must attend a minimum of 4 hours per day for 180/days per year of instruction.
  • There are no required educational subjects.
  • Tennessee requires you to keep a record of your child’s attendance each year to submit to the Director of Schools.
  • Homeschool students are required to take a standardized test in grades 5, 7, and 9. These test scores must be submitted to the Director of Schools.

Texas

  • Texas Homeschool Law does not require that you send a notice to your school that you are homeschooling.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send a withdrawal letter and contact them to officially withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • There are no specific qualifications for instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that your child must attend homeschooling.
  • There are five required educational subjects: Math, spelling, grammar, reading, and good citizenship.
  • Texas does not require you to keep records of your homeschooling, but it is encouraged.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in yearly testing.

Utah

  • Utah Homeschool Law requires you to submit a notarized affidavit to your school district.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send the affidavit and contact your child’s school to officially withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • There are no specific qualifications for instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that your child must attend homeschooling.
  • There are no specific required education subjects.
  • Utah does not require you to keep records of your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in yearly testing.

Vermont

  • Vermont Homeschool Law requires you to send a written enrollment notice every year to the Commissioner of Education that you are homeschooling.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send the notice and contact your child’s school to officially withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • There are no specific qualifications for instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that your child must attend homeschooling.
  • There are eleven required educational subjects: basic communication skills, reading, writing, use of numbers, US citizenship, history and government; physical education, health, literature, natural science, and fine arts.
  • Vermont does not require you to keep records of your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in testing every year through an educational evaluation, a written report and portfolio, or a standardized achievement test.

Virginia

  • Virginia Homeschool Law requires you to send a Notice of Intent to your superintendent but August 15th every year. You must include the subjects that your child that year and a copy of your qualification.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send the notice and contact your child’s school to officially withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • Homeschool instructors must meet one of the four following requirements: have a high school diploma or higher, have a Virginia teaching certificate, enroll your child in a distance learning program, or show evidence that you can provide sufficient education for your child.
  • Homeschool students are required to attend 180 days per year of instruction.
  • There are no specific required educational subjects.
  • Virginia does not require that you keep a record of your child’s homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in yearly testing via a standardized test, educational evaluation or assessment, or a report card from a distance learning program. Results must be sent to your superintendent by August 1st.

Washington

  • Washington Homeschool Law requires you to send a Declaration of Intent to your superintendent before September 15th every year that you homeschool.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send the declaration and contact your child’s school to officially withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • Homeschool instructors must meet one of the four following qualifications: 30 college semester credit hours, completion of a parent qualifying course in-home instruction, allow a certified person to oversee your homeschooling or approval from the superintendent of your school district.
  • Homeschool students must attend 180 days per year of instruction.
  • There are eleven required educational subjects: reading, writing, spelling, language, math, science, social studies, history, health, occupational education, and art and music appreciation.
  • Washington requires that you keep records of annual tests or assessments, immunizations and other records relating to your child’s homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in yearly testing either by taking a standardized achievement test or by being evaluated by a certified person.

West Virginia

  • West Virginia Homeschool Law requires you to send a Notice of Intent to your superintendent.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send the notice and contact your child’s school to officially withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • Home school instructors must have a high school diploma or GED.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year that your child must attend homeschooling.
  • There are five required educational subjects: reading, language, mathematics, science, and social studies.
  • West Virginia requires you to keep a record of your child’s yearly educational assessment for up to three years.
  • Homeschool students are required to participate in yearly educational assessments and can choose one of the following: a national standardized test, a public school testing program, a portfolio evaluation, or an alternative academic assessment. Results must be sent to your county superintendent at the end of grades 3, 5, 8 and 11.

Wisconsin

  • Wisconsin Homeschool Law requires you to submit an affidavit with the Department of Public Instruction every year before October 15th.
  • If you need to withdraw your child, send the affidavit and contact your child’s school to officially withdraw your child before homeschooling.
  • There are no specific requirements for instructors.
  • Homeschool students must attend 875 hours per year of instruction.
  • There are six required educational subjects: reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and health.
  • Wisconsin does not require that you keep any specific records for your homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in yearly testing.

Wyoming

  • Wyoming Homeschool Law requires that you submit a list of your curriculum to your school’s board of trustees at the beginning of every school year.
  • If your child needs to withdraw, first submit your curriculum and then send a withdrawal letter to your school to officially withdraw.
  • There are no specific qualifications for instructors.
  • There are no minimum hours per day or days per year of instruction.
  • There are seven required educational subjects: reading, writing, mathematics, civics, history, literature, and science.
  • Wyoming does not require you to keep specific records for your child’s homeschooling.
  • Homeschool students are not required to participate in yearly testing.
State 2019 Pop. 2019 Growth
Alabama4,898,2460.21%
Alaska735,720-0.23%
Arizona7,275,0701.44%
Arkansas3,026,4120.42%
California39,747,2670.48%
Colorado5,770,5451.32%
Connecticut3,567,871-0.13%
Delaware975,0330.81%
District of Columbia711,5711.30%
Florida21,646,1551.63%
Georgia10,627,7671.03%
Hawaii1,416,589-0.27%
Idaho1,790,1822.05%
Illinois12,700,381-0.32%
Indiana6,718,6160.40%
Iowa3,167,9970.38%
Kansas2,910,931-0.02%
Kentucky4,484,0470.35%
Louisiana4,652,581-0.16%
Maine1,342,0970.28%
Maryland6,062,9170.33%
Massachusetts6,939,3730.54%
Michigan10,020,4720.25%
Minnesota5,655,9250.80%
Mississippi2,987,8950.05%
Missouri6,147,8610.35%
Montana1,074,5321.15%
Nebraska1,940,9190.60%
Nevada3,087,0251.73%
New Hampshire1,363,8520.55%
New Jersey8,922,5470.16%
New Mexico2,096,0340.03%
New York19,491,339-0.26%
North Carolina10,497,7411.10%
North Dakota760,9000.11%
Ohio11,718,5680.25%
Oklahoma3,948,9500.15%
Oregon4,245,9011.32%
Pennsylvania12,813,9690.05%
Rhode Island1,056,738-0.05%
South Carolina5,147,1111.24%
South Dakota892,6311.18%
Tennessee6,833,7930.94%
Texas29,087,0701.34%
Utah3,221,6101.91%
Vermont627,1800.14%
Virginia8,571,9460.64%
Washington7,666,3431.74%
West Virginia1,791,951-0.77%
Wisconsin5,832,6610.33%
Wyoming572,381-0.93%