Speed Limits By State 2019

Speed limits are restrictions on the minimum and maximum speeds vehicles may travel on a given stretch of road. Speed limits are designated by signs and are used in many countries. In the United States, speed limits are used to protect drivers and regulate unruly or dangerous behavior on the roads.

There is no guarantee that posting speed limits has any effect on driver behaviors, as most drivers will ultimately travel at the speed that they feel the most comfortable going. However, law enforcement does monitor the speed of motorists and failure to adhere to posted speed limits can result in fines and, depending on how fast a driver is going, arrest.

Speed limits vary between states and are often different for rural interstates, urban interstates, and other types of roads. Montana has different speed limits for day and night on certain types of roads. Some states, such as California and Arkansas, have different speed limits for trucks and cars.

There are three main categories of roads: arterial, collector and local. Arterial roads have higher speeds and fewer access points, such as on- and off-ramps. Collector roads have high speeds and are balanced to have more access points. Local roads have lower speeds and more access points, such as intersections and cross streets. The difference between these three types of streets is the reason why there are different speed limits. Roads with fewer travelers and fewer vehicles attempting to cross one another can sustain higher speeds, while roads with more volume of travelers and have more bikers or pedestrians need to have lower speeds.

South Dakota has the highest speed limits in the United States. Rural and urban interstates both have a speed limit of 80 miles per hour and other roads are posted at 70 miles per hour. Hawaii has the overall lowest speed limits in the United States. Rural and urban interstates in Hawaii have a speed limit of 60 miles per hour and other roads are posted at 45 miles per hour.

Below is a table with each state’s speed limits for rural interstates, urban interstates, and other roads.

* All speeds are in miles per hour.
State Rural Interstates Urban Interstates Other Roads 2019 Pop.
Hawaii6060451,416,589
Alaska655555735,720
Connecticut6555553,567,871
Delaware655555975,033
Kentucky6565554,484,047
Massachusetts6565556,939,373
New Hampshire6565551,363,852
New Jersey6555558,922,547
New York65655519,491,339
Oregon6555654,245,901
Rhode Island6555551,056,738
Vermont655550627,180
Alabama7065654,898,246
California70656539,747,267
Florida70656521,646,155
Georgia70706510,627,767
Illinois70555512,700,381
Indiana7055556,718,616
Iowa7055653,167,997
Maryland7070556,062,917
Michigan70705510,020,472
Minnesota7065605,655,925
Mississippi7070652,987,895
Missouri7060656,147,861
North Carolina70705510,497,741
Ohio70655511,718,568
Pennsylvania70705512,813,969
South Carolina7070555,147,111
Tennessee7070656,833,793
Virginia7070558,571,946
Washington7060607,666,343
West Virginia7055551,791,951
Wisconsin7070555,832,661
Arizona7565657,275,070
Arkansas7565653,026,412
Colorado7565655,770,545
Idaho7575701,790,182
Kansas7575652,910,931
Louisiana7570654,652,581
Maine7575601,342,097
Nebraska7570651,940,919
New Mexico7575552,096,034
North Dakota757565760,900
Oklahoma7570703,948,950
Texas75757529,087,070
Utah7565653,221,610
Wyoming757570572,381
Montana8065701,074,532
Nevada8065703,087,025
South Dakota808070892,631