Suicide Rates By State 2019

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC for short, compiled extensive data on the suicide rates of each state in the US. The University of Washington also put together their findings on the rates of depression in people nationwide, and after categorizing the responses by state, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation reported the depression rates of each state in the USA for every 100,000 people.

We will show you individual lists that display the suicide rates, the number of deaths by suicide, and the depression rates of people in each US state in 2017. Even those these data points date back to 2016 and 2017, these findings are the most solid and all-encompassing results of any accessible data collected over the years.

The order of the fifty states of America, starting with the state with the lowest suicide rate to the state with the highest suicide rate, are as follows...

The fifty US states in order of the most suicides to the lowest suicide rates by state are…

  • Montana
  • Alaska
  • Wyoming
  • New Mexico
  • Utah
  • Idaho
  • Nevada
  • Oklahoma
  • Colorado
  • South Dakota
  • West Virginia
  • North Dakota
  • Missouri
  • Arkansas
  • Kansas
  • Oregon
  • Arizona
  • Vermont
  • New Hampshire
  • Kentucky
  • Tennessee
  • Maine
  • Alabama
  • South Carolina
  • Indiana
  • Washington State
  • Pennsylvania
  • Wisconsin
  • Iowa
  • Louisiana
  • Ohio
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Virginia
  • Nebraska
  • North Carolina
  • Mississippi
  • Texas
  • Delaware
  • Rhode Island
  • Illinois
  • California
  • Connecticut
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • New York
  • New Jersey

Suicide is a serious issue, to state the obvious. But something to take into consideration regarding suicide rates in the United States of America is that many suicides are the result of circumstances that were beyond avoidable. One thing that is a heavy commonality among people who die by suicide is an unshakeable feeling of dread, despair, loneliness, and hopelessness. These adjectives can be said to be overused in the discussions revolving around suicide, but they need to be taken seriously in order for suicide rates by state to decrease.

As you can tell by viewing the University of Washington’s collective data on the depression rates nationwide, people in 2017 were reportedly very unhappy with life in general. While situations outside of an individual’s control play a huge role in someone’s mental well-being, other innate factors such as disorders of the mind and abnormalities at birth can heighten someone’s propensity for experiencing depression, whether as the occasional episode or a lifelong ailment.

In order to lower the rates of deaths that occur as a result of suicide, the country needs to address many common underlying factors that add up and make someone more likely to choose suicide as an outlet. Depression rates are one factor that hold serious importance, but other factors to take into consideration are…

  • Academic performance
  • Physical condition
  • Mental health and well-being
  • Economical standing
  • Financial struggles
  • Workplace performance
  • Overall life satisfaction

The list truly goes on and on, but one factor that holds true is that the United States could be working more intuitively and intentionally to decrease the suicide rates by state in the nation. The suicide rates in the United States are not always the most reliable because many suicides go undetected. Even so, it is possible to identify which states have more at-risk factors and then deduce which states are more likely to bear witness to their residents passing away by suicide.

* Rates are per 100,000 people
State Suicide Rate Total Suicides Number 2019 Pop.
Montana28.93111,074,532
Alaska27200735,720
Wyoming26.9157572,381
New Mexico23.34912,096,034
Idaho23.23921,790,182
Utah22.76633,221,610
South Dakota22.5191892,631
West Virginia21.13931,791,951
Arkansas20.86313,026,412
Nevada20.36273,087,025
Colorado20.311815,770,545
North Dakota20.1154760,900
Kansas19.15532,910,931
Oklahoma19.17563,948,950
Oregon198254,245,901
Maine18.92741,342,097
New Hampshire18.92651,363,852
Missouri18.511516,147,861
Vermont18.3112627,180
Arizona18.213277,275,070
Kentucky16.97704,484,047
Washington16.912977,666,343
Tennessee16.811666,833,793
Alabama16.68364,898,246
South Carolina16.38385,147,111
Indiana16.310926,718,616
Wisconsin15.49265,832,661
Hawaii15.22271,416,589
Louisiana15.27204,652,581
Mississippi154452,987,895
Iowa154793,167,997
Pennsylvania15203012,813,969
Ohio14.8174011,718,568
Nebraska14.72751,940,919
North Carolina14.3152110,497,741
Michigan14.1145710,020,472
Florida14322721,646,155
Minnesota13.87835,655,925
Georgia13.6145110,627,767
Virginia13.411798,571,946
Texas13.4377829,087,070
Rhode Island11.81291,056,738
Delaware11.6112975,033
Illinois11.2147412,700,381
Connecticut10.54053,567,871
California10.5431239,747,267
Maryland9.86306,062,917
Massachusetts9.56826,939,373
New Jersey8.37958,922,547
New York8.1169619,491,339