Worst States To Retire 2019

Most people have their ideal retirement location – the place they will retreat to for their rest of their lives after many years of working. One’s dream spot, however, might not be realistic or within their means. And while everyone’s preferences for retirement are different there are states considered to be the “best” and “worst” for retirement.

The cost of living is a big factor for retirement, as it varies greatly between states. Additionally, crime rate, weather, health care, and whether or not the state taxes Social Security benefits are all taken into consideration when finding the ideal place to retire.

The largest factor of these, and arguably the most significant, is the annual spending for comfortable retirement (the cost of living) in each state.

Based on this factor, the top ten worst states to retire in are:

  1. Hawaii
  2. District of Columbia
  3. California
  4. New York
  5. Massachusetts
  6. Maryland
  7. Oregon
  8. Alaska
  9. Connecticut
  10. Rhode Island

Not surprisingly, this list is very similar to the most expensive states to live in.

Hawaii is considered to be the worst state to retire in. The annual spending for comfortable retirement in Hawaii is the highest of all 50 states at $117,724.18 per year. While the weather might be beautiful and the thought of an island retirement sounds ideal to many people, Hawaii is one of the most expensive states to both live and retire in.

The District of Columbia follows Hawaii with annual spending for comfortable retirement of $100,879.90 per year. Hawaii and Washington DC are the only two states with annual spending for comfortable retirement above $100,000.

If one were to base their retirement location entirely on the lowest cost of living, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, and Michigan would be the best options.

Below is a table of each state’s annual spending for comfortable retirement.

State Annual Spending for Comfortable Retirement 2019 Pop.
Hawaii$117,724.181,416,589
District of Columbia$100,879.9711,571
California$85,893.4439,747,267
New York$84,035.6219,491,339
Massachusetts$82,8596,939,373
Maryland$81,310.816,062,917
Oregon$81,248.884,245,901
Alaska$80,877.32735,720
Connecticut$79,762.623,567,871
Rhode Island$75,861.191,056,738
New Jersey$75,861.198,922,547
Vermont$73,507.94627,180
Maine$72,579.031,342,097
Washington$67,810.617,666,343
New Hampshire$67,686.761,363,852
Nevada$67,067.483,087,025
Delaware$65,643.15975,033
Colorado$65,333.515,770,545
Montana$64,404.61,074,532
Virginia$63,166.058,571,946
Minnesota$62,856.415,655,925
Florida$61,246.321,646,155
North Dakota$61,122.44760,900
Pennsylvania$61,060.5212,813,969
South Dakota$60,998.59892,631
South Carolina$60,874.735,147,111
Utah$60,812.813,221,610
Arizona$60,503.177,275,070
Wisconsin$59,326.555,832,661
Illinois$59,264.6212,700,381
West Virginia$58,645.341,791,951
Idaho$58,335.711,790,182
North Carolina$58,211.8510,497,741
Louisiana$57,964.144,652,581
Nebraska$57,778.361,940,919
Ohio$57,468.7211,718,568
New Mexico$57,468.722,096,034
Kentucky$56,849.454,484,047
Iowa$56,849.453,167,997
Texas$56,539.8129,087,070
Georgia$56,477.8810,627,767
Wyoming$56,044.39572,381
Indiana$55,796.686,718,616
Kansas$55,548.972,910,931
Tennessee$55,425.116,833,793
Alabama$55,425.114,898,246
Michigan$55,301.2610,020,472
Missouri$54,991.626,147,861
Arkansas$54,743.913,026,412
Oklahoma$54,558.133,948,950
Mississippi$53,071.872,987,895