Dusseldorf Population 2017

Dusseldorf is one of Germany’s most populous cities. It is the capital of North Rhine-Westphalia. The city is one of the most influential in the country, and it has become known around the world for its fairs and trade shows, as well as its role as an international business center. The city’s population as of the end of 2015 was 612,178. A long history, a rich culture, and the many business opportunities offered within this city have made it one of the most livable cities in the world.

Dusseldorf Demographics

Over 100,000 Dusseldorf residents are foreign, with many coming to the city because of the employment opportunities it offers. According to figures from 2017, the largest group of foreign residents is from Turkey. Other foreign groups with numbers in the tens of thousands are from Greece, Poland, Yugoslavia and Italy. There are also thousands of immigrants from Syria, Spain, Morocco, Russia and Iraq.

The city also has one of the largest Jewish populations in the country, as well as the one of the largest populations of Japanese residents in all of Europe.

Dusseldorf History

Dusseldorf began as a collection of fishing and farming settlements near the Dussel River during the 7th and 8th centuries. The name Dusseldorf was mentioned in writing in 1135. Later in the 1100s, the city was ruled by the Counts of Berg. About one hundred years later, in 1288, Dusseldorf was given town privileges. The city was protected by walls throughout the 1300s, and a market was established along the banks of the Rhine River. Other buildings and monuments were erected in the centuries that followed.

After the Napoleonic Wars, the city was stricken by poverty. However, following Napoleon’s defeat, the city was given to the Kingdom of Prussia, where its economy was revitalized during the Industrial Revolution. During the late 1800s, the city saw a strong period of population growth. The city was designated as a capital in 1946 and spent the following years rebuilding following the damaging effects of World War II.

Today, Dusseldorf is a leading financial and industrial center. Telecommunications is one of its largest and most prosperous industries. The city is also home to multiple internet companies, auto manufacturers, and headquarters of major companies including Metro, L’Oreal, and Henkel.

Dusseldorf Population Growth

Dusseldorf through the years has seen population increases that has made it one of the largest cities in Germany. In the 1800s, the city surpassed the 100,000 resident milestone and in 1962, numbers had jumped to surpass 700,000. After some population declines in the years to follow, Dusseldorf’s population began to rise again in the late 1990s and is expected to continue on a path of slow and steady growth in the future.

Dusseldorf Population in 2018Source: By Assumulator (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Dusseldorf Population Data (Urban Area)

Year Population Growth Rate (%) Growth
2030642,0001.74%11,000
2025631,0002.27%14,000
2020617,0001.48%9,000
2017608,0000.83%5,000
2015603,0002.55%15,000
2010588,0002.44%14,000
2005574,0000.88%5,000
2000569,000-0.52%-3,000
1995572,000-0.52%-3,000
1990575,0001.95%11,000
1985564,000-5.05%-30,000
1980594,000-5.26%-33,000
1975627,000-5.43%-36,000
1970663,000-3.21%-22,000
1965685,0000.44%3,000
1960682,00017.18%100,000
1955582,00016.17%81,000
1950501,0000.00%0
Dusseldorf Population Growth

Dusseldorf's 2017 population is now estimated at 608,000. In 1950, the population of Dusseldorf was 501,000. Dusseldorf has grown by 5,000 in the last year, which represents a 0.83% change. These population estimates and projections come from the latest revision of the UN World Urbanization Prospects. These estimates represent the Urban agglomeration of Dusseldorf, which typically includes Dusseldorf's population in addition to adjacent suburban areas.

Data Sources
  1. World Urbanization Prospects - United Nations population estimates and projections of major Urban Agglomerations