Morse Code Alphabet

The Morse code is a telecommunication method named after Samuel Morse, one of the inventors of the telegraph. In 1837, Morse developed the early version of the modern Morse code, and it was first used in 1844.

Morse code is usually transmitted through an electric current, radio waves, visible light, or sound waves via an on-off keying of the medium.

Morse code encodes text characters in standardized sequences of dots and dashes (or dits and dahs). In Morse code transmission, a dot or dit is the basic unit of time measurement. International Morse code has five guidelines:

  1. The length of a dot is one unit.
  2. The dash is three units.
  3. The space between parts of the same letter is one unit.
  4. The space between letters is three units.
  5. The space between words is seven units.

International Morse code ensures the 26 letters of the Latin alphabet, one non-Latin letter, and the Arabic numerals. There is also a small set of punctuation and procedural signals. Additional Morse alphabets have been developed for other natural languages that use more than the 26 letters of the Latin alphabet.

Letter
Morse Code
A.-
B-...
C-.-.
D-..
E.
F..-.
G--.
H....
I..
J.---
K-.-
L.-..
M--
N-.
O---
P.--.
Q--.-
R.-.
S...
T-
U..-
V...-
W.--
X-..-
Y-.--
Z--..