How Old is United States?

How old is the United States?

The United States officially became a country in 1776 through the union of its initial 13 states. Below is the timeline until present day:

1776–1789

American Revolution - 1765–1783

Confederation Period - 1783–1788

1789–1849

Federalist Era - 1788–1801

Jeffersonian Era - 1801–1817

Era of Good Feelings - 1817–1825

Jacksonian Era - 1825–1849

1849–1865

Civil War Era - 1850–1865

1865–1918

Reconstruction Era - 1865–1877

Gilded Age - 1877–1895

Progressive Era - 1896–1916

1918–1945

World War I - 1917–1919

Roaring Twenties - 1920–1929

Great Depression - 1929–1941

World War II - 1941–1945

1945–1964

Post-war Era - 1945–1964

1964–1980

Civil Rights Era - 1965–1980

1980–1991

Reagan Era - 1981–1991

1991–2008

Post-Cold War Era - 1991–2008

2008–present

Modern-day - 2008–present

Why is July 4th Celebrated?

America, as it is named, is actually a misnomer. "America" consists of both the North and South American continents. it has existed since the dawn of time and was possibly visited many times prior to its being recorded. Generally, it is widely accepted in the American school system that explorer Christopher Columbus was the first to set foot in North America in 1492 and report back to the British Empire. Some refute this, with certain scholars saying that Asian colonies first visited South America by accident when sailing in the 13th century, with Vikings landing near what is now New England and the eastern provinces of Canada as early as the 9th century.

1607 was the start of the colonial period, where ships and boats from England and its colonies would settle here under the flag of the British Empire. It was a grueling time, as starvation, lack of medicine, hostilities towards aboriginals, and the fight against the French, Spanish and Dutch for control of the Americas were intense. Unlike mainland England, the colonial period saw an influx of many European settlers from many walks of life. The first province to be established by the Empire was Virginia, specifically Jamestown. 13 more colonies were created until the American Revolution, which began with the signing of the Declaration of Independence from the British Empire, signed on July 4th, 1776. Thus, July 4th is recognized as the anniversary of the day that America declared itself a sovereign nation.

What Caused the U.S to Separate From the British Empire?

Throughout the entirety of the colonial period, the colonies struggled to survive. Resources were abundant, but methods of extraction were difficult. It was an entirely new landscape that did not have the privileges of "home". Proper housing, roads, food supply, and social advancement were extremely difficult and many lived in harsh conditions. The British Empire had been the dominant force for many years and secured its position by claiming colonies that would pay them tribute in resources. The Empire flourished at first, eclipsing the French and Dutch - and later, splitting the American continents with the Spanish.

The thirteen colonies finally could afford to be self-sufficient, but by the mid-1700s, the disapproval rating of the Empire was extremely high - as they demanded more and more tribute to be paid. The people revolted in 1776 and eventually won their independence.