What States Are Outhouses Legal 2022

What States Are Outhouses Legal?

The stances on outhouses go beyond "legal" and "illegal". Below are the laws of each state. Be sure to check with your local representatives as well.

Alabama: Allowed if an approved Graywater method is also provided. Alaska: Outhouses are allowed but strict rules apply. Arizona: Legal with a permit. Certain modifications may apply. Arkansas: Legal with NSF approval. California: Legal with local or state approval. Certain modifications may apply. Colorado: Legal with NSF approval. Connecticut: Legal with local or state approval. Certain modifications may apply. Delaware: No regulations. Florida: Legal with NSF approval. Georgia: Legal with NSF approval. Hawaii: Legal with NFS approval, and case-by-case. Certain modifications may apply. Idaho: Allowed if an approved Graywater method is also provided and connected to the sewer system. Illinois: Legal with NSF approval. Indiana: Extremely restrictive, only allowed if no sanitary sewer is available. Iowa: Legal with a permit. Certain modifications may apply. Kansas: Ambiguous between composting toilets and pit privies. Kentucky: Legal with a permit. Certain modifications may apply. Louisiana: No regulations. Maine: Legal with a permit. Certain modifications may apply. Maryland: Legal with a permit. Certain modifications may apply. Massachusetts: Legal with many modifications, further contact your state or mayor. Michigan: Each county sets its own law. Certain modifications may apply. Minnesota: Legal with few regulations. Certain modifications may apply. Mississippi: Legal with local or state approval. Missouri: Extremely restrictive, only allowed if no sanitary sewer is available. Montana: Legal with many modifications. Nebraska: Legal with a permit. Nevada: Legal with a permit. New Hampshire: Only allowed if no sanitary sewer is available. New Jersey: Legal with many modifications or regulations. New Mexico: Legal with a permit. New York: Legal with few regulations. North Carolina: Only allowed if no sanitary sewer is available. Certain modifications may apply. North Dakota: Legal with few regulations. Ohio: Legal with few regulations. Oklahoma: No regulations. Oregon: Legal with a permit. Certain modifications may apply. Pennsylvania: Legal with NSF approval. Rhode Island: Legal, but must provide appropriate disposal of liquid wastes and solid matter. South Carolina: Legal, but only when used with a septic system. South Dakota: Only allowed if no sanitary sewer is available. Tennessee: Legal with NSF approval. Texas: Legal with NSF approval. Utah: Legal with many modifications. Vermont: Legal with few regulations. Virginia: Generally prohibited without an extenuating circumstance. Certain modifications may apply. Washington: Legal, but must have a connection with a sewerage system. West Virginia: Legal with NSF approval. Wisconsin: Relaxed regulations. Wyoming: Some outhouses will require a permit if self-contained. Certain modifications may apply.

How Does The US Regulate Off-Grid Living?

Outhouses are generally considered off-grid modifications for the release of human waste. Few states make the distinction between the two extremes of legal and illegal; Most have adopted a hybrid approach that is more relaxed or not. Generally speaking, if the area is highly metropolitan, has a large population, or is concerned about water usage, their laws will be more strict in regards to outhouse installation.

What States Are Outhouses Legal 2022