Is Weed Legal in South Carolina?

November 2021 updates indicate that weed containing THC is still fully illegal in the state of South Carolina. Not much has changed since cannabidiol, also known as CBD, became legal in SC for specific medical cases. However, talk of changing the laws concerning medicinal or recreational THC cannabis still take place.

Legal CBD Concentrations

SC first legalized CBD in 2014 for use with treating severe epileptic seizures. Laws at this time stated that the total CBD concentration must not exceed more than 15 percent. Only .9 percent of THC was allowed for this reason. By 2021, however, the state did decide to allow residents to purchase .3 percent THC concentration in CBD and has permitted people to purchase it.

Medicinal Legalization Updates

Senator Tom Davis continues to petition for marijuana by way of a bill he first worked on in 2015. As of May 2021, he said that South Carolina does not want to legalize recreational marijuana. However, Senator Davis did confirm a desire to draft a bill that would empower doctors and help patients.

Talks of medical marijuana legalization continued throughout summer of 2021. However, it may not become legal yet by the end of 2021.

Conditions Treated with Marijuana

Medical marijuana would treat a variety of conditions, which it has already in other states. For instance, cannabis can treat symptoms of PTSD, glaucoma, epilepsy, nerve disorders, or cancer and multiple sclerosis. Before receiving cannabis treatment, an official diagnosis and confirmation of whatever condition a person has must be made.

Concerns About Recreational Use

Minds might end up changing about recreational marijuana use at some point. However, South Carolina has seen what it’s done to Colorado. For instance, SC representatives raised concerns about a reportedly increased crime rate and apparently increased numbers of suicidal thoughts. Possible stunted child development also came up in the conversation about recreational cannabis based on effects in other states.

Production and Sales Regulation

The South Carolina Department of Health wants to limit who can grow, produce and sell marijuana and cannabis products. Therefore, anyone involved in weed supply chains will require licensing pertaining to their role in making plant-based medicines available to the public.

A number one concern through all of this is to make sure any marijuana offered to patients is evaluated by the FDA. This includes inspections at time of harvest and before the shipment of each plant. This could involve a variety of procedures, such as making sure the product is not laced with illegal drugs.