Whaling Countries 2021

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1. Japan

This nation discontinued its association with the International Whaling Commission in 2018. They declared their plans to still hunt sei, Bryde and minke whales. The International Union for Conservation of Nature first added the sei whale to the endangered list in 2008. Japan is only one of three whaling companies that hunts for commercial purposes.

2. The United States

Non-commercial whaling occurs in Alaska. Locals participate in this activity as a means of survival. No commercial hunting is allowed here. In fact, only three countries hunt whales for profit: Japan, Norway and Iceland. The non-commercial harvesting for food doesn’t compare to the almost 40,0000 whales commercially hunted even after IWC banned the practice in 1986. By 2018, Federal laws forbid killing of gray whales, but it allowed natives to hunt some other species. Updates about whaling are provided by the IWC, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and similar organizations.

3. Norway

Since 1993, this whaling country still hunts more than the quota allowed by the IWC. It has not adhered to the commercial whale hunting agreement made in 1986. In 2019, Norway reportedly killed more whales than Japan, and it’s one of three commercial whaling countries. Both Norway and Island objected whaling moratoriums, which IWC members are allowed to do. By 2015, about 40 percent of female whales killed by Norway were pregnant.

4. Iceland

It's one of the whaling countries that separated from the IWC the longest. Since 1991, this nation decided not to remain connected with the organization advocating commercial whale hunting restrictions. They did try to rejoin the IWC in 2002, however. They sometimes hunt the endangered fin whale.

This nation is one of three that harvests whale for profit. In 2015, some hunting advocates believed that these large animals ate all the fish. However, arguments against this theory also prevail. By this time, only less than 2 percent of locals ate the meat. However, more than 35 percent of visitors did. Even then, apparently hunters wasted much of the meat.

5. Faroe Islands

By 2019, this independent Denmark territory ended the lives of more than 100 whales. However, this area uses the meat within its community and doesn’t sell it. Neither the IWC whaling registrations nor national or EU last affect their local traditions.

Like most whaling countries, Faroe locals only hunt for food. They have harvested this animal since 1584. Hunters divide meat and blubber among all participating harvesters. Community members who cannot hunt because of illness or disability still receive a share if they want it.

Whaling Countries 2021

Whaling Countries 2021