Bicycle Laws By State 2020

Riding a bicycle is an excellent form of exercise and a unique way of getting around, especially in a city where distances are just barely too far to walk, but parking can be somewhat nightmarish. Bikes are also relatively inexpensive (you can probably find a decent one for around $100 at a bicycle resale shop) and do not require any fuel to operate, so they are incredibly cost-effective. They do not add to the buildup of fossil fuel emissions in the environment.

If you just bought a bicycle or are planning to get one soon, you need to familiarize yourself with biking laws in your state. Many states have rules for bicyclists to follow to help ensure their safety on the road. In most states, bicyclists do have to follow the same signs and signals as automobile drivers. That means that bicyclists have to stop at red lights and stop signs and must watch for pedestrians.

Some states have laws about whether or not bicyclists can ride on a sidewalk to protect pedestrians on the sidewalk from being hit by a bicycle. Some allow bicyclists to ride on sidewalks in neighborhoods but not in busy business districts, while others do not allow bicyclists on the sidewalk at all. Consistent with traffic laws regarding slower vehicles, many states require that bicyclists ride in the far-right lane or a designated bicycle lane. Many states do not allow bicyclists to ride on highways or freeways, as fast-moving traffic can create a sharp blast of wind that can knock a bicyclist over.

State laws also address the safety equipment necessary for biking. Many states require that bicyclists wear a helmet; even if your state does not require a helmet, wearing one is always a smart choice. Helmets need to fight tightly around the head to prevent possible brain injury in the event of a crash. Some states also require reflectors, especially at night, and other safety equipment. Some states also require that bicyclists use hand signals to indicate when they are preparing to turn; even when these signals are not mandatory, they are a good idea.

While bicycle laws may seem cumbersome, they are ultimately designed to ensure that bicyclists and pedestrians remain safe while sharing the road with fast-moving automobiles. Learning the laws in your state regarding biking can help you make sure that you stay safe while getting lots of exercise in an environmentally clean, cost-effective way.

Bicycle Laws By State 2020

State 2020 Pop.
Alabama4,908,620
Alaska734,002
Arizona7,378,490
Arkansas3,039,000
California39,937,500
Colorado5,845,530
Connecticut3,563,080
Delaware982,895
District of Columbia720,687
Florida21,993,000
Georgia10,736,100
Hawaii1,412,690
Idaho1,826,160
Illinois12,659,700
Indiana6,745,350
Iowa3,179,850
Kansas2,910,360
Kentucky4,499,690
Louisiana4,645,180
Maine1,345,790
Maryland6,083,120
Massachusetts6,976,600
Michigan10,045,000
Minnesota5,700,670
Mississippi2,989,260
Missouri6,169,270
Montana1,086,760
Nebraska1,952,570
Nevada3,139,660
New Hampshire1,371,250
New Jersey8,936,570
New Mexico2,096,640
New York19,440,500
North Carolina10,611,900
North Dakota761,723
Ohio11,747,700
Oklahoma3,954,820
Oregon4,301,090
Pennsylvania12,820,900
Rhode Island1,056,160
South Carolina5,210,100
South Dakota903,027
Tennessee6,897,580
Texas29,472,300
Utah3,282,120
Vermont628,061
Virginia8,626,210
Washington7,797,100
West Virginia1,778,070
Wisconsin5,851,750
Wyoming567,025