Bridge Laws By State 2020

In 1975, the U.S. Congress enacted the bridge formula to limit the weight-length ratio of a vehicle crossing a bridge. This is done by increasing the distance between axels or by spreading weight over additional axles. The reason for the formula is because, during the 1950s and 1960s, trucks grew heavier and began putting too much strain on bridges on the interstate highways.

The bridge formula is calculated by multiplying the distance in feet between the outer axles of any group of two or more consecutive axles by the number of axles in the group under consideration. This number is then divided by the number of axles in the group under consideration minus one. After getting this quotient, add 36 and the product of 12 times the number of axles in the group under consideration to the quotient. This final number is then multiplied by 500 to get the overall gross weight on any group of two or more consecutive axles to the nearest 500 pounds.

In addition to the bridge formula weight limits, federal law states that gross weight vehicle is limit to 80,000 pounds. States have given exemptions to different types of vehicles to operate above the standard federal truck size and weight limits. This exemption often only applies to non-Interstate highways.

Below is each state’s maximum gross weight limit. Each state’s interstate limit is 80,000 lbs. unless exempt or indicated that longer combination vehicles (LCV) are exempt.

Alabama

  • 84,000 lbs. on 6 axles

Alaska

  • Up to 145,000 lbs. on 11 axles
  • Exempt from the interstate weight limit

Arizona

  • 80,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate limit

Arkansas

  • 80,000 lbs.

California

  • 80,000 lbs.

Colorado

  • 85,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate limit

Connecticut

  • 80,000 lbs.

Delaware

  • 80,000 lbs. on 5 axles

District of Columbia

  • 80,000 lbs.

Florida

  • 80,000 lbs.

Georgia

  • 80,000 lbs.

Hawaii

  • 88,000 lbs.

Idaho

  • 105,500 on 6 axles
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Illinois

  • 73,280 lbs. on non-national highways

Indiana

  • 80,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Iowa

  • 80,000 lbs.

Kansas

  • 85,500 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Kentucky

  • 80,000 lbs.

Louisiana

  • 88,000 lbs. tri or quad axle

Maine

  • 90,000 lbs.

Maryland

  • 80,000 lbs.

Massachusetts

  • 80,000 lbs.

Michigan

  • 164,000 lbs. on 11 axles

Minnesota

  • 80,000 lbs. on 6 axles

Mississippi

  • 80,000 lbs. (57,650 on highway class)

Missouri

  • 73,280 lbs. (2,000 tolerance)
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Montana

  • 80,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Nebraska

  • 95,000 on 7 axles

Nevada

  • Uncapped
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

New Hampshire

  • 80,000 lbs.

New Jersey

  • 80,000 lbs.

New Mexico

  • 86,400 lbs.

New York

  • 80,000 lbs.

North Carolina

  • 80,000 lbs.

North Dakota

  • 105,500 lbs. on 7 axles
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Ohio

  • 80,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Oklahoma

  • 90,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Oregon

  • 80,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Pennsylvania

  • 80,000 lbs.

Rhode Island

  • 80,000 lbs.

South Carolina

  • 80,000 lbs.

South Dakota

  • Uncapped
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Tennessee

  • 80,000 lbs.

Texas

  • 80,000 lbs.

Utah

  • 80,000 lbs.
  • Longer combination vehicles (LCV) exempt from the interstate weight limit

Vermont

  • 80,000 lbs.

Virginia

  • 80,000 lbs.

Washington

  • 80,000 lbs.

West Virginia

  • 65,000 lbs. (73,500 lbs. on some highways)

Wisconsin

  • 80,000 lbs.

Wyoming

  • 117,000 on 8 axles

Bridge Laws By State 2020

Source:
State 2020 Pop.
Alabama4,908,620
Alaska734,002
Arizona7,378,490
Arkansas3,039,000
California39,937,500
Colorado5,845,530
Connecticut3,563,080
Delaware982,895
District of Columbia720,687
Florida21,993,000
Georgia10,736,100
Hawaii1,412,690
Idaho1,826,160
Illinois12,659,700
Indiana6,745,350
Iowa3,179,850
Kansas2,910,360
Kentucky4,499,690
Louisiana4,645,180
Maine1,345,790
Maryland6,083,120
Massachusetts6,976,600
Michigan10,045,000
Minnesota5,700,670
Mississippi2,989,260
Missouri6,169,270
Montana1,086,760
Nebraska1,952,570
Nevada3,139,660
New Hampshire1,371,250
New Jersey8,936,570
New Mexico2,096,640
New York19,440,500
North Carolina10,611,900
North Dakota761,723
Ohio11,747,700
Oklahoma3,954,820
Oregon4,301,090
Pennsylvania12,820,900
Rhode Island1,056,160
South Carolina5,210,100
South Dakota903,027
Tennessee6,897,580
Texas29,472,300
Utah3,282,120
Vermont628,061
Virginia8,626,210
Washington7,797,100
West Virginia1,778,070
Wisconsin5,851,750
Wyoming567,025