Executor Fees By State 2020

When an individual has deceased, an executor serves as the personal representative of the decedent by sorting out their finances and ensuring that all debts and taxes are paid and adequately distributing what is left over to the heirs as defined in their will.

Executor services usually last between one to three years, and how much they will receive is dependent on several factors, including what is dictated by the decedent’s last will and testament, and most important for the purposes of this article, with state law.

Some states use reasonable compensation to determine executor fees, meaning the probate court determines compensation. Typically, the probate court will find executor fees reasonable if it aligns with what people have received in the past as compensation in that area. This notion means that if executor fees were typically 1.5%, then 1.5% would be considered reasonable, and 3% may be unreasonable. However, the court may also take other factors into account, such as how complicated the estate is to administer.

Many states use reasonable compensation to calculate executor fees, however other states have created their own statutes, as detailed below:

Arkansas fees cannot exceed:

• 10% of the first $1,000 • 5% of the next $4,000 • 3% of the rest

California uses this formula:

• 4% on the first $100,000 • 3% on the next $100,000 • 2% on the next $800,000 • 1% on the next $9,000,000 • 0.5% on the next $15,000,000 • For all amounts above $25,000,000, remaining executor fees in California are to be a reasonable amount as determined by the court

Georgia has set a 2.5% fee

Iowa fees cannot exceed:

• 6% for the first $1,000 • 4% for the next $1,000-$5,000 • 2% for remaining amounts greater than $5,000

Kentucky executor fees should not exceed 5%

Louisiana has set a 2.5% fee

Maryland fees cannot exceed:

• 9% if less than $20,000 • $1,800 plus 3.6% of the excess over $20,000

Missouri uses this formula:

• First $5,000 is 5% • Next $20,000 is 4% • Next $75, 000 is 3% • Next $300, 000 is 3.75% • Next $600,000 is 2.5% • Greater than $1,000,000 is 2%

Montana uses this formula:

• First $40,000 is 3% • Greater than $40,000 is 2%

Nevada uses this formula:

• First $15,000 is 4% • Next $85,000 is 3% • Greater than $100,000 is2%

New Jersey uses this formula:

• First $200,000 is 5% • $200,001-$1,000,000 is 3.5% • Greater than $1,000,000 is 2%

New York uses this formula:

• First $100,000 is 5% • Next $200,000 is 4% • Next $700,000 is 3% • Next $4,000,000 is 2.5% • Remaining amounts greater than $5,000,000 is 2%

North Carolina executor fees should not exceed 5%, therefore reasonable compensation is often used

Ohio uses this formula:

• First $100,000 is 4% • $100,001-$400,000 is 3% • Greater than $400,000 is 2%

Oklahoma uses this formula:

• First $1,000 is 5% • Next $5,000 is 4% • Remaining amounts greater than $6,000 is 2.5%

Oregon uses this formula:

• First $1,000 is 7% • $1,001-$10,000 is 4% • $10,001-$50,000 is 3% • Greater than $50,000 is 2%

South Carolina fees cannot exceed 5%

Texas fees are typically 5%

West Virginia uses this formula:

• First $100,000 is 5% • $100,001-$400,000 is 4% • $400,001-$800,000 is 3% • Remaining amounts greater than $800,000 is 2%

Wisconsin fees are typically 2%

Wyoming uses this formula:

• First $1,000 = 10% • $1,001-$5,000 = 5% • $5,001-$20,000 = 3% • Remaining amounts greater than $20,000 = 2%

Executor Fees By State 2020

State 2020 Pop.
Alabama4,908,620
Alaska734,002
Arizona7,378,490
Arkansas3,039,000
California39,937,500
Colorado5,845,530
Connecticut3,563,080
Delaware982,895
District of Columbia720,687
Florida21,993,000
Georgia10,736,100
Hawaii1,412,690
Idaho1,826,160
Illinois12,659,700
Indiana6,745,350
Iowa3,179,850
Kansas2,910,360
Kentucky4,499,690
Louisiana4,645,180
Maine1,345,790
Maryland6,083,120
Massachusetts6,976,600
Michigan10,045,000
Minnesota5,700,670
Mississippi2,989,260
Missouri6,169,270
Montana1,086,760
Nebraska1,952,570
Nevada3,139,660
New Hampshire1,371,250
New Jersey8,936,570
New Mexico2,096,640
New York19,440,500
North Carolina10,611,900
North Dakota761,723
Ohio11,747,700
Oklahoma3,954,820
Oregon4,301,090
Pennsylvania12,820,900
Rhode Island1,056,160
South Carolina5,210,100
South Dakota903,027
Tennessee6,897,580
Texas29,472,300
Utah3,282,120
Vermont628,061
Virginia8,626,210
Washington7,797,100
West Virginia1,778,070
Wisconsin5,851,750
Wyoming567,025