Praxis Scores by State 2022

The Praxis test is a test taken by individuals who want to enter the teaching profession. The test measures the academic skills and subject-specific knowledge required for teaching. It is part of the certification process required by many states and licensing organizations.

There are three different Praxis tests:

  • Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators (Core) - measures academic skills in reading, writing, and mathematics
  • Praxis Subject Assessments - measure subject-specific knowledge and evaluates general and subject-specific teaching skills
  • Praxis Content Knowledge for Teaching Assessments - measure subject-specific content knowledge with a focus on specialized knowledge used in elementary teaching.

The Praxis test can last anywhere from 1 to 4 hours long. Each test has selected-response questions, essay or constructed-response questions, or a combination of other types. Tests cost anywhere from $60 to $200, depending on the exam, plus additional service fees. For example, Nevada charges a $5 state surcharge fee per test. On most tests, each selected-response question answered correctly is scored as one raw point. The raw score the candidate receives is the number of questions answered correctly on the exam. The raw score is converted to a scale that adjusts the score based on the difficulty of the exam.

Below is a table with all the Praxis Test score minimums for each state participating. In your research, you’ll find that there are a lot of states that deviate from this kind of testing, so be sure to do your own research into what it takes to become a teacher in your state.

Praxis Test Scoring Ranges

Constructed-response questions are scored by two or more professional educators who practice in the appropriate content areas. The scaled range of possible scores for most Praxis exams is between 100 and 200 points. This is with the exception of the ParaPro Assessment, which scores between 420 and 480.

The Praxis tests are used by most state education agencies to help determine the licensing of new educators. Praxis tests are not required in [Florida] and [Texas]. For the Praxis Core Mathematics exam, the passing score required is 150 for all states except for [Washington], which requires 142. For the Praxis Core Reading exam, all states require a minimum score of 156. All states have a minimum passing score of 162 for the Praxis Core Writing exam except for Washington, which requires 158, and [North Dakota], which requires 160.

While there are many subject exam state requirements, it is easiest to give an average range of passing scores that encompass all 50 states. ETS provides data on average score ranges to give an idea of study benchmarks and the difficulty of various exams. Below are the test names and the score range for passing.

  • Elementary Education: Reading and Language Arts Subtest: 162-179
  • Elementary Education: Mathematics Subtest: 161-186
  • Elementary Education: Social Studies Subtest: 156-177
  • Elementary Education Science Subtest: 161-179
  • Praxis PLT - Grades 7-12: 169-183
  • Praxis PLT - Grades K-6: 169-183
  • Speech-Language Pathology: 171-184
  • Elementary Education - Content Knowledge: 160-179
  • Praxis Mathematics - Content Knowledge: 137-169
  • Praxis Social Studies - Content Knowledge: 157-178
  • Praxis English Language Arts - Content Knowledge: 171-186
  • Special Education: Core Knowledge and Applications; 165-181
  • Middle School Mathematics: 157-180
  • ParaPro Assessment: 462-276

Below is a table with the minimum scores from each state that participate in Praxis Testing. We also note the process to become a teacher for any state not participating.

For more specific score requirements for each state, ETS compiled a Praxis Minimum/Passing Score Requirements page that contains each state’s minimum score for every exam.

Result Reporting

There are two things that happen to scores once the scoring process is completed, they get posted to your official Praxis account (you are notified when this happens), and your scores are sent to all the agencies and institutions you chose to notify upon registration.

Different Processes By State

Each state has its own process for almost everything, but especially for the vetting process for potential teachers. To help anyone looking into what it takes, we have also documented the tests required to become certified in states that deviate from the three-part Praxis structure noted above.

Arizona

The Arizona Department of Education breaks down getting certified into six steps. After identifying the area of certification you’d like to pursue, you will then choose a “pathway” program that aligns with your goals. Those come in three forms, including a Traditional Bachelor’s Degree Educator Preparation Program, a Traditional or Alternative Post-Baccalaureate Educator Preparation Program, and an Alternative Educator Preparation Certificate Program.

After completing a preparation program, you will need to pass all appropriate Arizona Educator Proficiency Assessments (AEPA), which will prompt issuance of an “Institutional Recommendation.” Once you have that, you can apply for certification with the state.

California

In California, once you choose a direction, you’ll need to look into the requirements. Teach California clears up this information as each track (Elementary, Secondary, and Special Education) has its own conditions. Upon completing the first step, you’ll need to find and complete a compatible Preparation Program which will then allow you to look into teaching positions.

Colorado

Prospective educators need to (roughly) have a bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited institution, completion of an approved teacher preparation program, an approved verification form, and a complete application for licensure. Additionally, they either have to “demonstrate professional competencies” with 24 hours of completed coursework (shown via transcript evaluation), or they must pass the Colorado State Board of Education-approved content assessment.

Basically, the state checks and uses assessments of its own choosing, and you must pass the ones relevant to your area of education.

Georgia

Because there are different requirements for each level (special education, elementary, middle, and high school), you’ll need to check with the Georgia Professional Standards Commission for your specific tasks to complete. Hopeful teachers will also need to complete a GaPSC-approved education preparation program. To start the program, you’ll need to take the Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE) or have acceptable scores on the Praxis I, SATs, or ACTs.

Illinois

Upon completing an approved teacher preparation, prospective teachers will have to take the Illinois Testing System (ILTS) Test of Academic Proficiency and the ILTS Content Area Test in the subject necessary.

Indiana

In Indiana, prospective teachers need to take and pass three different assessments, the Indiana Core Academic Skills Assessment (CASA), the Developmental/Pedagogical exam, and the Indiana Core content exam. After which, they can apply for their certifications.

Massachusetts

To become a teacher in Massachusetts, you’ll need to have a bachelor’s degree or higher, take and pass all necessary Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), and complete any required performance assessments. Certification requirements in this state are some of the strictest, so be sure to research all possible avenues.

Michigan

Michigan educators are required to complete an approved preparation program, hold a bachelor’s degree, and complete/pass the following:

  • Reading courses, three credit hours for secondary and six for elementary
  • A course in first-ard and resuscitation
  • Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC)

Missouri

Once you have a bachelor’s degree and have completed an approved teacher preparation program, you must take and pass the necessary pedagogy and content-are assessments. All of this will qualify you for an Initial Professional Certificate (IPC), and then you have to accumulate four years of teaching experience to be able to receive the Career Continuous Professional Certificate (CCPC).

New Mexico

In New Mexico, there are different levels of teaching licenses, Level I Provisional Teacher License, Level II, and Level III-A. Depending on the setting, level, and subject you are teaching, there are different conditions you have to meet. There are also different paths depending on your level of education. At some point, you’ll likely have to complete some combination of the New Mexico Teacher Assessments (NMTA).

Pennsylvania

While the Pennsylvania Department of Education does use Praxis Testing sometimes, they have their own. Below is a list of all the different Pennsylvania-specific Praxis tests that they require depending on your goal.

  • GRADES 4-8 CORE ASSESSMENT (5152) ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS AND SOCIAL STUDIES SUBTEST (5154), Score: 152
  • CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION: CONTENT KNOWLEDGE (0087/5087), Score: 148
  • MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE SUBTEST (5155), Score: 164
  • PEDAGOGY SUBTEST (5153), Score: 164
  • GRADES 4-8 SUBJECT CONCENTRATION: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (5156), Score: 156
  • GRADES 4-8 SUBJECT CONCENTRATION: MATHEMATICS (5158), Score: 173
  • GRADES 4-8 SUBJECT CONCENTRATION: SCIENCE (5159), Score: 156
  • GRADES 4-8 SUBJECT CONCENTRATION: SOCIAL STUDIES (5157), Score: 150

Texas

The state of Texas does, in no way, participate in the Praxis Testing System, but rather they use these test systems that you’ll have your choice of before submitting a state application for certification.

Virginia

After the other education requirements are met, potential teachers must pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and then the Praxis content-area exams relevant to you.

There are at least two tests that the state specifically holds, including

  • READING FOR VIRGINIA EDUCATORS: ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION (0306/5306), Score: 157
  • READING FOR VIRGINIA EDUCATORS: READING SPECIALIST (0304/5304), Score: 162

Praxis Scores by State 2022

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