Senators By State 2020

According to the United States Constitution, each state gets to have two senators that serve in the United States Senate. The number of representatives in the House of Representatives depends on the population of the state. As a result, the most populous states in the country have the same representation in the Senate as the least populated states. With 50 states in the country and two senators for each state, there are 100 senators in the United States Senate.

Senators serve terms of six years; if they wish to continue serving after that time, they must be re-elected by the citizens of their states. However, imagine if every single senator came up for election at the same time – what could happen is that all of the people who serve in the Senate could be brand new to the job, all at the same time! To make sure that this situation does not happen and that there are always experienced senators present, there are elections every two years. One-third of Senate seats go up for election every two years, so there is always some continuity in terms of who is serving in the Senate.

Most senators belong to either the Democratic or Republican parties. If a state is heavily Republican, its citizens will likely elect Republican senators. If a state is heavily Democratic, its citizens will likely elect Democratic senators. Nevertheless, the greatest predictor of whether or not a senator will be re-elected is not if his or her party corresponds with the party that is most favored by the state’s citizens. The greatest predictor of whether or not a senator will be re-elected is if he or she is already a sitting senator.

Why? Because most people do not know what policies their senators have voted on or what their political views are. They may know the senators’ names, and they are likely to vote for them because they recognize those names. Incumbency is the greatest asset a senator can have in order to be re-elected.

Sometimes, senators do change parties after they are already in office. A Democratic senator may become a Republican, and a Republican senator may become a Democratic. These switches can be very controversial among voters and can also impact whether or not the senator is re-elected. Also, some senators are not from the Democratic or Republican parties. They are either Independent (no party affiliation) or belong to a different, smaller party.

Senators By State 2020

State 2020 Pop.
Alabama4,908,620
Alaska734,002
Arizona7,378,490
Arkansas3,039,000
California39,937,500
Colorado5,845,530
Connecticut3,563,080
Delaware982,895
Washington DC720,687
Florida21,993,000
Georgia10,736,100
Hawaii1,412,690
Idaho1,826,160
Illinois12,659,700
Indiana6,745,350
Iowa3,179,850
Kansas2,910,360
Kentucky4,499,690
Louisiana4,645,180
Maine1,345,790
Maryland6,083,120
Massachusetts6,976,600
Michigan10,045,000
Minnesota5,700,670
Mississippi2,989,260
Missouri6,169,270
Montana1,086,760
Nebraska1,952,570
Nevada3,139,660
New Hampshire1,371,250
New Jersey8,936,570
New Mexico2,096,640
New York19,440,500
North Carolina10,611,900
North Dakota761,723
Ohio11,747,700
Oklahoma3,954,820
Oregon4,301,090
Pennsylvania12,820,900
Rhode Island1,056,160
South Carolina5,210,100
South Dakota903,027
Tennessee6,897,580
Texas29,472,300
Utah3,282,120
Vermont628,061
Virginia8,626,210
Washington7,797,100
West Virginia1,778,070
Wisconsin5,851,750
Wyoming567,025