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Pennsylvania
60,000
Georgia
30,768
Illinois
23,500
New York
20,000
California
16,773
Virginia
15,679
Missouri
15,000
South Carolina
14,250
North Carolina
13,700
Indiana
10,000
Minnesota
10,000
Kentucky
9,461
Connecticut
9,000
New Jersey
8,477
Wisconsin
8,459
Colorado
7,783
Tennessee
7,721
Oklahoma
7,500
Arkansas
7,000
Mississippi
6,219
Iowa
6,000
Louisiana
5,500
Maine
5,000
Montana
5,000
Massachusetts
4,794
Maryland
4,125
Florida
4,000
Oregon
3,675
Ohio
3,600
North Dakota
3,000
Utah
2,915
Washington
2,895
West Virginia
2,818
Nebraska
2,800
New Hampshire
2,700
Rhode Island
2,306
Hawaii
2,300
Idaho
2,300
Kansas
2,300
Alaska
2,198
Texas
2,100
Arizona
2,000
Nevada
2,000
South Dakota
1,847
Vermont
1,700
Michigan
1,688
Delaware
1,500
New Mexico
1,000
Wyoming
780

Spanish Flu Deaths by State 2024

Spanish Flu Deaths by State 2024

The Spanish flu lasted from 1918 to 1920 and infected an estimated 500 million people worldwide. The U.S. states were affected, and all 50 states had deaths as a result of this flu epidemic.

It is important to remember that all numbers of deaths are estimates. There is no way that completely accurate numbers could be kept during the time period. Still, these estimates allow us to compare the impact of the Spanish flu on each state.

States With High Death Tolls

Pennsylvania was by far the state with the highest death toll. There were an estimated 60,000 Pennsylvania residents that dies during the pandemic. This is almost double the number of deaths of the next highest state, Georgia, which had 30,768 deaths. Other states with over 20,000 deaths were Illinois and New York.

Seven states had death toll between 10,000 and 20,000 deaths as a result of the Spanish flu. These states were California (16,773), Virginia (15,679), Missouri (15,000), South Carolina (14,250), North Carolina (13,700), Indiana (10,000), and Minnesota (10,000).

While data for Alabama is unrecorded, it is known to be very high. Cases and deaths erupted too quickly to maintain accurate records.

It makes sense that many of these states would have higher numbers of deaths. They were states with large populations or that had high concentrations of people in urban areas. This concentration of people make it easier for viruses and other illnesses to spread.

States with Low Death Tolls

Most states had between 2,000 and 10,000 deaths during the 1918-1920 time period resulting from Spanish flu infection. However, because of smaller populations and lesser population density, some states had much lower death numbers.

South Dakota (1,847), Vermont (1,700), Michigan (1,688), Delaware (1,500), and New Mexico (1,000) each had between 1,000 and 2,000 deaths. Again, these numbers may not be completely accurate, as some sources place Delaware’s death toll as high as 2,000.

The only state with less than 1,000 deaths is also the state with the fewest deaths in the country. Wyoming had only 780 deaths during the Spanish flu pandemic. Wyoming had a population that was spread out, which made the flu slow to spread. Fewer infections obviously result in fewer deaths.

Spanish Flu Deaths by State 2024

Note: Values displayed for Alabama, Alaska, Delaware, and Nebraska are notably imprecise due to breakdowns in the state's reporting capacity at the time. Additional details are listed in each state's notes section.

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State
Deaths in 1918
Notes
Pennsylvania60,000
Georgia30,768
Illinois23,500
New York20,000
California16,773
Virginia15,679
Missouri15,000
South Carolina14,250
North Carolina13,700
Indiana10,000
Minnesota10,000
Kentucky9,461
Connecticut9,000
New Jersey8,477
Wisconsin8,459
Colorado7,783
Tennessee7,721
Oklahoma7,500
Arkansas7,000
Mississippi6,219
Iowa6,000
Louisiana5,500
Maine5,000
Montana5,000
Massachusetts4,794
Maryland4,125
Florida4,000
Oregon3,675
Ohio3,600
North Dakota3,000
Utah2,915
Washington2,895
West Virginia2,818
Nebraska2,800
Actual estimates range from 2,800 to 7,500, as Nebraska’s reporting capacity was significantly compr...
New Hampshire2,700
Rhode Island2,306
Hawaii2,300
Idaho2,300
Kansas2,300
Alaska2,198
Texas2,100
Arizona2,000
2,000 is considered the minumum count, as many deaths are believed to have gone uncounted.
Nevada2,000
South Dakota1,847
Vermont1,700
Michigan1,688
Delaware1,500
Some sources place totals as high as 2,000.
New Mexico1,000
Wyoming780
showing: 49 rows

Spanish Flu Deaths by State 2024

Sources