Drone Laws By State 2020

Drones have become increasingly popular over the past few years. In addition to playing with them for fun, they are used to take aerial photos of homes for real estate listings, survey tracts of land, even find where farmers may be illegally growing narcotics! Nevertheless, these flying objects have the potential to cause problems, not only in terms of privacy (using them to take pictures of people and private property without consent) but also in terms of air safety. Drone operators do not need to file flight plans before using them, but aircraft operators do. Without flight planes established, drones have the potential of running into aircraft and causing a crash. To help prevent these kinds of scenarios, some states have enacted laws that regulate the use of drones.

All states except for Alabama, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, and South Carolina have laws regulating the use of drones either at a state or a local level. Some states merely have an advisory board but no definitive laws, some states ban specific uses of drones (such as for spying on individuals), and some states require registration and training before using a drone. If you want to operate a drone, make sure that you check your state’s laws first to prevent any legal trouble later.

Additionally, there are federal policies that regulate the use of drones. You can only operate a drone at 400 feet in the air or lower because once you pass 400 feet, you are in air space that is tightly regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). You must keep the drone within your line of sight so that you can see it at all times and carry a drone registration with you while operating it. Federal law does require that, as of 2018, drone operators register their drones with the federal government and obtain a license. There are other federal regulations for the operation of a drone, and new legislation is passed somewhat regularly.

If you have a drone, check your state and local laws to make sure that you are in full compliance; doing so now can save legal trouble later. Remember that these laws are designed to protect people’s privacy and to ensure public safety. Using a drone can be much fun and also very helpful for many occupations (such as realtor and land surveyor), but landing a fine or other legal issues will kill the fun.

State 2020 Pop.
Alabama4,908,620
Alaska734,002
Arizona7,378,490
Arkansas3,039,000
California39,937,500
Colorado5,845,530
Connecticut3,563,080
Delaware982,895
District of Columbia720,687
Florida21,993,000
Georgia10,736,100
Hawaii1,412,690
Idaho1,826,160
Illinois12,659,700
Indiana6,745,350
Iowa3,179,850
Kansas2,910,360
Kentucky4,499,690
Louisiana4,645,180
Maine1,345,790
Maryland6,083,120
Massachusetts6,976,600
Michigan10,045,000
Minnesota5,700,670
Mississippi2,989,260
Missouri6,169,270
Montana1,086,760
Nebraska1,952,570
Nevada3,139,660
New Hampshire1,371,250
New Jersey8,936,570
New Mexico2,096,640
New York19,440,500
North Carolina10,611,900
North Dakota761,723
Ohio11,747,700
Oklahoma3,954,820
Oregon4,301,090
Pennsylvania12,820,900
Rhode Island1,056,160
South Carolina5,210,100
South Dakota903,027
Tennessee6,897,580
Texas29,472,300
Utah3,282,120
Vermont628,061
Virginia8,626,210
Washington7,797,100
West Virginia1,778,070
Wisconsin5,851,750
Wyoming567,025