Fireworks Laws By State 2021

Fireworks shows can be fun to watch, especially when there is a big, city-wide spectacular on the Fourth of July or New Year’s Eve. However, if you enjoy fireworks, you may have noticed that the ones you can buy at a roadside stand are not nearly as impressive as the ones that are used in professional shows. One reason why is because different states have different laws regarding fireworks, especially in which fireworks are available to consumers (as opposed to professionals, such as the ones who mastermind those big displays for the public).

Today, consumer fireworks are legal for purchase in 46 states and Washington, DC. Ohio, Vermont, and Illinois only allow the purchase of sparklers and other novelty-type fireworks, and Massachusetts does not permit the sale of fireworks at all. Critics of these fireworks bans look at how easily people can cross state lines to buy fireworks, especially in the small state of Massachusetts. They also look at how much safety regulations on fireworks have increased over the past few decades, so promoting good education regarding fireworks may be more effective at preventing injuries than banning them altogether.

Consumer fireworks that can be purchased in most states include Roman candles, sparklers, poppers, snakes, helicopters, ground spinners, and multiple tube fireworks. They must have fewer than 50mg of gunpowder and follow some other regulations. Additionally, the fuses on consumer fireworks have to burn for at least three seconds but no more than nine seconds, to help ensure that they do not explode in the face of the person who is lighting them.

If you enjoy using consumer fireworks, make sure that you check with your state’s regulations concerning how you need to use them (unless you live in a state where they are illegal). There are probably regulations regarding how far outside of city limits you have to be and required distance from a body of water. Make sure that you have water nearby that you can use to put out any fire that may erupt. Also, make sure that you carefully read the safety information on the fireworks to prevent injury in case the fireworks malfunction.

Keep in mind that while fireworks can be fun to play with, they are also dangerous and require caution when using them. They are explosives and can cause fires and physical injury; people die every year from fireworks that did not explode correctly. So have fun and be safe!

Fireworks Laws By State 2021

State Fireworks Permitted Fireworks Prohibited Age to Purchase
AlabamaItem that comply with regulations of the CPSC, DOT efinitions and trick noisemakers."Illegal ground salutes," fireworks contraining more than 2 grains of explosive composition, any mail-order fireworks16 (unless accompanied by adult)
AlaskaRoman candles, skyrockets, helocopter rockets, cylindrical and cone fountains, wheels, torches, dipped sticks, mines and shells, firecracks with soft casings, and novleiesAll fiireworks not defined and salable consumer fireworks18
ArizonaGround based sparkling devices including fountains, multiple tube cake devices, illuminating torches, wheels, and ground spinnersAerial consumer fireworks, bottle & sky rockets, helicopters, torpedoes, roman candles, & jumping jacks16
ArkansasRoman candles, skyrockets, helocopter rockets, cylindrical and cone fountains, wheels, torches, dipped sticks, mines and shells, firecracks with soft casings, and novleies12
CaliforniaGround & hand-held sparkling devices, cylindrical & cone fountains, wheel & ground spinners, illuminating torch, flitter sparklers (morning glory) not exceeding 10” in length or 1⁄4” in diameter, toy smoke device, party poppers and snappers.Firecrackers, skyrockets, rockets, roman candles, chasers, all wire & wooden stick sparklers, surprise items, friction items, torpedoes, firework kits, and fireworks containing arsenic, phosphorus, thiocyanates magnesium (magnesium-aluminum alloys permitted ), mercury salts, picrates or picric acid, gallates or gallic acid, chlorates (with few excepts), boron, titanium (except particle sizes larger than 100 mesh), zirconium, gunpowder, and fireworks kits.16
ColoradoCylindrical and cone fountains, ground spinners, torches and colored fire, dipped sticks and sparklers, snakes and glow worms, trick noisemakers, and certain other novelties. These items are subject to size and chemical composition limitations.Firecrackers, aerial devices, audible ground devices, and any fireworks not specifically permitted.16
ConnecticutHand-held and ground based sparkling devices that are non-explosive and non-aerial, and do not contain more than 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition per item.All other consumer fireworks including multiple- tube sparkling devices that exceed 100 grams of total pyrotechnic composition. Novelty items are illegal.16
DelawareWood stick and wire sparklers with no more than 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition; other hand-held or ground-based sparkling devices which are non-explosive and non-aerial, which may produce a crackling or whistling effect, and which contain 75 grams or less of pyrotechnic composition per tube or a total of 500 grams or less for multiple tubes; snakes, glow worms and smoke devices which contain 20 grams or less of pyrotechnic composition; trick noisemakers, which include party poppers, snappers and drop pops, each containing 16 mg or less of pyrotechnic composition.All consumer fireworksnot specifically permitted including firecrackers, torpedoes, sky rockets, Roman candles, daygo bombs and aerial shell devices.18
FloridaDevices approved and listed by State Fire Marshal which emit a shower of sparks upon burning, do not contain any explosive compounds, do not detonate or explode, are handheld or ground based, cannot propel themselves through the air, and contain no more than 100 grams of the chemical compound that produces sparks upon burning. Any device that is not included in the list of approved items is prohibited, except that snakes, smoke devices, trick noisemakers, party poppers, booby traps, snappers, trick match. cigarette load, and auto burglar alarms, each of which are subject to size limitations and may be sold at all times.Firecrackers, torpedoes, skyrockets, roman candles, daygo bombs, and any fireworks containing explosive or flammable compounds.18
GeorgiaAll consumer fireworks meeting CPSC criteria; Roman Candles; wire or wood sparklers of 100 grams or less of mixture per item; other sparkling items which are nonexplosive and nonaerial and contain 75 grams or less of chemical compound per tube or a total of 500 grams or less for multiple tubes; snake and glow worms; smoke devices; or trick noise makers which include paper streamers, party poppers, string poppers, snappers, and drop props each consisting of 0.25 grains or less of explosive mixture.“[B]alloon, bag, parachute, or other similar device which requires fire underneath for propulsion or to release or cause to be released any floating water lantern or wish lantern which uses a flame to create a lighting effect in any public waterway, lake, pond, stream, or river.”18
HawaiiItems that comply with regulations of CPSC and DOT definitions. Permit required for each 5,000 individual units of firecrackersAerial fireworks such as, bottle rockets, sky rockets, missile-type rockets, helicopters, torpedoes, daygo bombs, roman candles, flying pigs, and jumping jacks, which move about the ground farther than inside a circle with a radius of twelve feet as measured from the point where the item was placed and ignited, aerial shells and mines.18
IdahoNon-aerial fireworks devices, such as ground spinners, fountains, sparklers, smoke devices, or snakes.Any fireworks not specifically permitted, such as firecrackers, jumping jacks, or similar products.18
IllinoisNovelty items including snakes or glow worms; smoke devices; trick noisemakers known as ‘party poppers’, ‘booby traps’, ‘snappers’, and sparklers. (List updated annually by state fire marshal)Handheld fireworks, bottle rockets, firecrackers, torpedoes, skyrockets, roman candles, chasers, buzz bombs, helicopters, missiles, pin wheels, planes.18
IndianaConsumer fireworks that comply with the construction, chemical composition, and labeling regulations of the U.S. Consumer Products Commission.A special discharge location, property of the person, or property of a person who has provided permission.18
IowaFirst-class consumer fireworks (aerial shell kits and reloadable tubes; chasers; helicopter and aerial spinners; firecrackers; mine and shell devices; missile-type rockets; roman candles; sky rockets and bottle rockets; multiple tube devices manufactured in accordance with APA 87-1, section 3.5) and second-class consumer fireworks (cone fountains; cylindrical fountains; flitter sparklers; grand and hand-held sparkling devices, including multiple tube ground and hand held sparking devices that are manufactured in accordance with APA 87-1, section 3.5; ground spinners; illuminating torches; toy smoke devices that are not classified as novelties pursuant to APA 87-1, section 3.2; wheels and wire or dipped sparklers that are not classified as novelties pursuant to APA 87-1, section 3.2).None18
KansasAll pyrotechnic devices classified as consumer fireworks by DOT, except certain rockets.Any rockets mounted on a wire or stick, including any device containing such rockets.18
KentuckyConsumer fireworks that comply with the construction, chemical composition, & labeling regulations of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission including aerial devices including rockets & bottle rockets, helicopters, & aerial spinners, roman candles, mines. Ground and hand-held sparkling devices (dipped stick or wire sparklers), cylindrical and cone fountain, illuminating torch, wheel, ground spinner, flitter sparkler,) smoke, novelties, and trick noisemakers, & audible ground devices18
LouisianaConsumer fireworks as defined by DOT and the CPSC. (This includes: cylindrical fountains, cone fountains, illuminating torches, pyrotechnic wheel devices, ground spinners, flitter sparklers, toy smoke devices, sky rockets and bottle rockets, missile- type rockets, helicopter aerial spinners, roman candles, mines or shells, firecrackers, and multiple tube fireworksCherry bombs, tubular salutes, 2” American-made salutes, firecrackers with casings exceeding 11⁄2”in length or 1⁄4” in diameter, repeating bombs, aerial bombs, torpedoes exceeding 3/8” in diameter, roman candles larger than 10 ball, and sky rockets with a casing of less than 5/8” in diameter and less than 2 7/8” in length, with an over all length of 15”.15
MaineConsumer fireworks items tested & certified by a 3rd party laboratory as conforming with CPSC standards.Missile type rockets, helicopters, aerial spinners, sky rockets, and bottle rockets, as defined by the State Fire Marshal.21
MarylandSparklers containing no chlorates or perchlorates, ground based sparkling devices that are non-aerial non-explosive, and are labeled in accordance with the requirements of CPSC. Paper wrapped snappers containing less than 3/100 grains of explosive composition, and snakes that contain no mercury and are not regulated by DOT. Note: retailers must submit products for testing and approval to State Fire Marshal’s Office prior to sale.All others.16
MassachusettsNoneFirecrackers, torpedoes, skyrockets, flares, candles, bombs, sparklers, wheels, colored fire, fountains, mines, and serpents.
MichiganAll consumer fireworks meeting CPSC criteria as defined in APA Std. 87-1 sections 3.1.2, 3.1.3 and 3.5 and ground & handheld sparkling devices.18
MinnesotaWire or wood sparklers of not more than 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition per item. Ground-based sparkling devices which are non-explosive and non-aerial, and contain 75 grams or less of chemical mixture per tube or a total of 500 grams or less for multiple tube items and include: fountains, cones, illuminating torches, wheels, ground spinners, flitter sparklers, flash / strobes, and novelty devices including snakes, glow worms, trick noisemakers, party poppers, and snappers.Firecrackers, torpedoes, missiles, skyrockets, bottle rockets, roman candles, daygo bombs, mines and shells, chasers, and parachutes.18
MississippiConsumer fireworks as defined by the CPSC containing 2 grams or less of explosive composition, including cone fountains, small Chinese crackers, small non-explosive Roman candles, and rockets. Nonexplosive sparklers are permitted.12
MissouriConsumer Fireworks in compliance with the regulations of the CPSC.Ground salutes that exceed DOT limits.14 (unless with a parent/guardian)
MontanaItems meeting the CPSC requirements, except for items specifically prohibited. Mail orders prohibited.Skyrockets, roman candles, bottle rockets.18
NebraskaNovelty items, snakes, and sparklers do not require a permit to be sold in Nebraska. Gold and silver sparklers (colored sparklers prohibited) spray fountains, torches, color fire cones, star and comet type aerial shells without explosive charge, lady fingers not to exceed 7⁄8” in length and 1⁄8” in diameter, total pyrotechnic composition not to exceed 50 mg. each, color wheels and any other item approved by Fire Marshal. Samples for all fireworks must be submitted to Fire Marshal prior to sale for separate test shoot examination. Permissible fireworks list issued annually in January.Rockets, unapproved wire sparklers, nighttime parachutes, firecrackers with more than 50mg of explosive composition, and other fireworks deemed unsafe by the State Fire Marshal.16
NevadaFireworks designated as consumer fireworks in some areas only.Dangerous fireworks, including large firecrackers, aerial displays and items that explode on impact or by friction.18
New HampshireConsumer fireworks designated as “Permissible Fireworks” which have been approved by the AFSL or other 3rd party testing agency including aerial devices, cakes, roman candles, ground spinner, party popper, snake/glow worm snapper, wheels and sparklers.Firecrackers, stick rockets/missiles, and any device that Produces solely smoke.21
New JerseyWood stick and wire sparklers with no more than 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition; other hand-held or ground-based sparkling devices which are non-explosive and non-aerial, which may produce a crackling or whistling effect, and which contain 75 grams or less of pyrotechnic composition per tube or a total of 500 grams or less for multiple tubes; snakes, glow worms and smoke devices and trick noisemakers, which include party poppers, snappers and drop pops, each consisting of 25/100 grains or less of explosive mixture.All consumer fireworks not specifically permitted including torpedoes, firecrackers, skyrockets, aerial devices and fireworks containing yellow or white phosphorous or mercury.16
New MexicoAll items that comply with the requirements of the CPSC, except stick-type rockets having a tube less than 1⁄4” inside diameter. Municipalities may prohibit use of aerial and ground audible devices.16
New YorkGround-based or hand held sparkling devices including cylindrical fountains, cone fountains, and wood sparklers/dipped sticks; party poppers, snappers.Aerial consumer fireworks, firecrackers and chasers, skyrockets, roman candles, bombs, and metal wire sparklers.18
North CarolinaSparklers, fountains, smoke devices, snake and glow worms, trick noisemakers such as party poppers, string poppers or snappers, and toy pistol caps.Explosives or aerial fireworks, roman candles, and rockets or similar devices.16
North DakotaStar lights, helicopter flyers, cylindrical fountains, cone fountains, wheels, torches, colored fire, sparklers, dipped sticks, comets, shells, soft shell firecrackers not to exceed 11⁄2” in length and 1⁄4” in diameter, total pyrotechnic composition not to exceed 50 mg each.12
OhioUsage prohibited except for trick and novelty items, smoke deivces, and sparklers.18
OklahomaAll consumer fireworks meeting the requirements of the CPSC, unless specifically prohibited. Novelties approved by U.S. DOT or deregulated by DOT.Skyrockets, including bottle rockets or stick rockets, M-80s, mail order sales of fireworks, and door to door sales.12
OregonConsumer fireworks obtained from an Oregon permitted retail stand, such as cones, fountains, and wheels. Aerial fireworks such as bottle rockets and roman candles. Also, any type of fireworks not obtained from an Oregon permitted retail stand. No internet purchases.16
PennsylvaniaConsumer fireworks that comply with the construction, chemical composition and labeling requirements of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and comply with the consumer fireworks provisions of APA Standard 87-1.18
Rhode IslandHand-held and ground based sparkling devices including fountains, illuminating torches, wheels, ground spinners, flitter sparklers, sparklers & novelties devices as defined in APA Std. 87-1.Aerial Consumer, Display Fireworks, and Pyrotechnics Unless permits are obtained.16
South CarolinaAerial Consumer, Display Fireworks, and Pyrotechnics Unless permits are obtained.Small rockets less than 1⁄2” in diameter and 3” long.16
South DakotaAll fireworks that comply with CPSC regulations. All consumer fireworks made wholly or in part of dynamite, nitroglycerin, or giant powder. Specifically prohibits firecrackers18
TennesseeItems meeting CPSC requirements.Illegal ground salutes and mail order purchase of fireworks by consumers.16 (17 with ID)
TexasAll fireworks meeting requirements of CPSC and DOT Consumer Fireworks definitions, except for small rockets (less than 4 gms propellant, and casings less than 5/8 of an inch x 3 1⁄2,” and overall length including stick of less than 1.8’’.)See section 2154.00 3(d).16
UtahThose fireworks sold at retail for consumer use and those not designated as Class C Dangerous Explosives. Newly allowed in 2011 are aerial devices known as multiple tube, repeater, or cakes lit by a single fuse.Firecrackers, bottle rockets, missiles, roman candles, skyrockets, rockets mounted on a wire or stick, ground salutes, M-80’s, cherry bombs, aerial salutes, flash shells, comets, mines, single shot or reloadable aerial shells, aerials that contain over 500 grams of pyrotechnic material & other illegal explosives are prohibited.16
VermontSparklers less than 14” long with no more than 20 grams of pyrotechnic mixture. Novelty sparkling items limited to snakes, party poppers, glow worms, smoke devices, string poppers, snappers, or drop pops with no more than 0.25 grains of explosive mixture, and that are in compliance with CPSC regulations.Firecrackers, skyrockets, roman candles, torpedoes, and daygo bombs18
VirginiaSparklers, fountains, pharaoh’s serpents, pinwheels, and whirligigs.Firecrackers, skyrockets, torpedoes, and other fireworks which explode, travel laterally, rise into the air, or fire projectiles into the air.18
WashingtonAs defined by DOT not specifically prohibited unless prohibited by local ordinance.Firecrackers, skyrockets, salutes, chasers, and bottle rockets.16
West VirginiaSparkling devices (fountains, wire sparklers, trick noisemakers, smoke devices, snakes). Firecrackers, torpedoes, sky rockets, roman candles, bottle rockets, reloadable shells, missile-type Rockets, helicopter and aerial spinners, multi-aerial mine and shell devices, aerial shell kits.18
WisconsinCylinder fountains, cone fountains, sparklers containing no magnesium, chlorate or perchlorate; snakes containing no mercury, small smoke devices.Firecrackers, wheels, torpedoes, skyrockets, roman candles, aerial salutes, and bombs.16
WyomingConsumer Fireworks meeting requirements of the CPSC.None16

Fireworks Laws By State 2021