Flu Rates By State 2020

Influenza, commonly known as the flu, is a contagious respiratory infection caused by viruses. It affects the nose, throat, and sometimes the lungs. The flu can be mild to severe, and sometimes fatal for high-risk groups. Symptoms include fever, cough, muscle aches, congestion, runny nose, and fatigue. The flu can be spread through saliva, physical contact, airborne respiratory droplets (coughing and sneezing), and contaminated surfaces.

The best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu shot every year. Because the virus changes from year to year, it is recommended that each person get a flu vaccine each year at the beginning of the flu season in the fall. The vaccine can help prevent the virus overall or, at the very least, can help keep the symptoms mild if contracted. Other ways to prevent the flu virus is to wash your hands consistently, avoid touching your face and eyes, and covering your nose and mouth when you sneeze using a tissue or the inside of your arm/elbow.

While the flu can be easily avoided with a vaccine and precautionary steps, people still get the flu every year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention consistently measure influenza activity throughout the United States and publishes a weekly surveillance report called FluView. FluView provides all up-to-date information about the flu virus, including activity estimates (sporadic, local activity, regional, and widespread) and levels of activity (minimal, low, moderate, and high).

There are ten states that have seen a decrease in flu rates. They are:

  • Wyoming (- 0.93%)
  • West Virginia (- 0.77%)
  • Illinois (- 0.32%)
  • Hawaii (- 0.27%)
  • New York (- 0.26%)
  • Alaska (- 0.23%)
  • Louisiana (- 0.16%)
  • Connecticut (- 0.13%)
  • Rhode Island (- 0.05%)
  • Kansas (- 0.02%)

Forty states have seen an increase in flu rates ranging from 0.03% to 2.05%. Overall, the states seeing the highest influenza activity are Louisiana with “high activity” and Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas, all with “moderate activity.”

Louisiana is the only state with “high” influenza activity, with most cases being seen in the New Orleans metro area and southern points of the state. The number of cases so far in 2019 exceeds a national average, which is 2.4% of outpatient cases, while Louisiana’s stands at 4.6% - nearly double the national average. The number of cases in Louisiana is higher than the number of cases in the past five years. Because temperatures usually drop further before seeing an onslaught of influenza-like cases, officials are concerned that the numbers will only continue to grow.

Flu Rates By State 2020

Source:
State 2020 Pop.
Alabama4,908,620
Alaska734,002
Arizona7,378,490
Arkansas3,039,000
California39,937,500
Colorado5,845,530
Connecticut3,563,080
Delaware982,895
District of Columbia720,687
Florida21,993,000
Georgia10,736,100
Hawaii1,412,690
Idaho1,826,160
Illinois12,659,700
Indiana6,745,350
Iowa3,179,850
Kansas2,910,360
Kentucky4,499,690
Louisiana4,645,180
Maine1,345,790
Maryland6,083,120
Massachusetts6,976,600
Michigan10,045,000
Minnesota5,700,670
Mississippi2,989,260
Missouri6,169,270
Montana1,086,760
Nebraska1,952,570
Nevada3,139,660
New Hampshire1,371,250
New Jersey8,936,570
New Mexico2,096,640
New York19,440,500
North Carolina10,611,900
North Dakota761,723
Ohio11,747,700
Oklahoma3,954,820
Oregon4,301,090
Pennsylvania12,820,900
Rhode Island1,056,160
South Carolina5,210,100
South Dakota903,027
Tennessee6,897,580
Texas29,472,300
Utah3,282,120
Vermont628,061
Virginia8,626,210
Washington7,797,100
West Virginia1,778,070
Wisconsin5,851,750
Wyoming567,025