No Fault Divorce States 2020

When most people enter into a marriage, they believe that their love will last forever. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case, which is why some people opt to get a divorce. There are a number of reasons that couples get divorced, whether it’s because of adultery, abuse, or something less sinister.

Because marriage is legally recognized, the couple must go through legal means in order to get a divorce. This means that paperwork must be filed with the local court, attorneys need to be hired, and mediation may occur in order to discuss splitting property, child support, and child visitation.

In some cases, the parties involved in the divorce don’t want to cast blame on the other partner. If both partners agree to this, they can file what is known as a no-fault divorce. In other words, the divorcing couple can tell the court that the marriage is over without having to provide a reason. California was the first state to implement no-fault divorce laws in 1970.

In 2019, all 50 states have allow no-fault grounds for divorce. However, there are just 17 states that are known as “true” no-fault states. This means that there is no option to cast blame and couples can only file on no-fault grounds. These states are as follows:

  • California
  • Colorado
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • Oregon
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin
  • Washington, D.C. also has true no-fault divorce laws.

This doesn’t necessarily mean that a divorce can’t be filed on other grounds. In some states, divorce can be filed on other grounds in unusual circumstances, such as insanity of one of the partners. In these states, the unusual circumstance must be proven.

In the remaining states, a divorce can occur on no-fault grounds. However, these states also allow couples to cast blame through traditional fault grounds. Some states also require the couple to live apart for a certain length of time before officially filing for divorce. For example, Kentucky’s requirements are two months, while Hawaii requires couples to be separated for at least 2 years.

No Fault Divorce States 2020

State 2020 Pop.
Alabama4,908,620
Alaska734,002
Arizona7,378,490
Arkansas3,039,000
California39,937,500
Colorado5,845,530
Connecticut3,563,080
Delaware982,895
District of Columbia720,687
Florida21,993,000
Georgia10,736,100
Hawaii1,412,690
Idaho1,826,160
Illinois12,659,700
Indiana6,745,350
Iowa3,179,850
Kansas2,910,360
Kentucky4,499,690
Louisiana4,645,180
Maine1,345,790
Maryland6,083,120
Massachusetts6,976,600
Michigan10,045,000
Minnesota5,700,670
Mississippi2,989,260
Missouri6,169,270
Montana1,086,760
Nebraska1,952,570
Nevada3,139,660
New Hampshire1,371,250
New Jersey8,936,570
New Mexico2,096,640
New York19,440,500
North Carolina10,611,900
North Dakota761,723
Ohio11,747,700
Oklahoma3,954,820
Oregon4,301,090
Pennsylvania12,820,900
Rhode Island1,056,160
South Carolina5,210,100
South Dakota903,027
Tennessee6,897,580
Texas29,472,300
Utah3,282,120
Vermont628,061
Virginia8,626,210
Washington7,797,100
West Virginia1,778,070
Wisconsin5,851,750
Wyoming567,025