Abandoned Cities

Out of all the cities throughout the United States, which are the most recognizable out there? Los Angeles, New York, Chicago? Regardless, each municipality has unique features that tear them apart from others.

Has anyone taken a moment to consider the ghost towns, though? Like big cities, they also were recognizable for specific attributes long ago. Now they’re forgotten, and many people don’t understand why. One day, they were the places for everyone to visit and enjoy. The next, they’re closed for good.

Now, it’s time to look at some of the more famous abandoned cities and the stories behind why they became abandoned. Here are some of the main ghost towns out in the country.

Elkmont Historic District — Elkmont, Tennessee

Elkmont, TN, is an abandoned city that was once known for its historic district. Elkmont may have started its reputation small, but it slowly gained plenty of tourism due to its natural appeal and its potential in the 1900s.

Soon, the district began to add various attractions to the city, like clubhouses and cabins. Everything was going smoothly until its sudden closure in 1992. During this time, people moved out of the town and lived in other areas.

Now, there are plans to turn the Elkmont Historic District into a museum for people to visit. Plans are already in progress to have the settlement operational by 2025.

Garnet, Montana

Garnet was a city that gained popularity during the gold rush in the 1890s. During that time, the population was on the rise, and various establishments began to pop up, which set up the city for being one of the best gold mining towns to live.

That soon changed once the 1900s started. During those times, the gold rush began to die down, and residents began to move away. A fire also caused some damage to the city in 1912, but what ultimately causes its demise was the results of World War II.

Now, Garnet is preserved by the Garnet Preservation Association, a non-profit organization with the mission of keeping the city’s history alive. The city is also said to be haunted, but tourists still come to learn about the rich culture.

Santa Claus, Arizona

Santa Claus was a city known for one theme: Christmas year-round. People from around the country would bring their children to see Santa Clause and experience the holiday in the 1930s.

Unfortunately, in the 1970s, that dream came to an end when Route 66 died down. Eventually, the attractions along the highway followed suit, and all that remains are the Santa-themed buildings.

Salton Riviera — Salton City, California

This city was once a tourist attraction for beachgoers who loved to lounge in style in the 1950s and 60s. From a fancy resort to a beautiful sight, the city was the perfect escape for people visiting for vacations and more.

There was one main problem that the city experienced: the water quickly became polluted. Once the pollution began, the water became challenging to manage, and tourists stopped coming. Today, the city and beach are abandoned, but people still come by to take pictures of the polluted area.