United States Population 2020 (Live)

331,008,036

Unlike China and India, the United States population is expected to continue to grow throughout the century with no foreseeable decline. By 2067, the U.S. population is expected to surpass 400 million people.

The population growth in the United States is mainly attributed to high rates of immigration, which have decreased since 2016, and the natural increase (the difference between births and deaths).

The United States population grows on average about 0.9% every year. The population grew 0.60% in 2019; the lowest rate the U.S. has had in a century. This is because of a decrease in the number of total births over the year. Additionally, more post-World War II baby boomers are reaching old age, increasing the number of deaths.

Despite a decrease in the population growth rate in recent years, the population is still expected to grow continuously.

United States Population Growth

Formal censuses were not carried out during the colonial era, but records show that the colonial population grew from a shaky start of just 3,800 in 1610 to over 1 million in 1750. The population grew rapidly moving forward, and when the first official census was held in 1790 shortly after independence, the population had grown to nearly 4 million.

The United States census is held once every ten years, to count the number of people in the country along with gathering basic information, including age, sex, and race. The last census was held in 2010, and the next census will be held in 2020.

The information collected in the census is used for many purposes. The first purpose is to ensure that each seat in Congress represents roughly the same amount of people. National and State governments also use the information to plan services - for example, if they know that the population in an area is growing rapidly, they can plan to build more housing, schools, and hospitals. Every year, the Census Bureau also releases annual population estimates. Statistical modeling methods are applied to the most recent census data to give an up-to-date picture of how the population of America changes between censuses.

United States Population Projections

The population of the US continues to grow today, driven by a high level of immigration. The latest data from the Census Bureau shows that US population growth is running at between 0.7% and 0.9% per year. A 2015 Census Bureau Report suggests that growth will slow somewhat, and projects a 2060 population of 417 million, with the country crossing the 400 million threshold in 2051.

The United Nations projects a lower total, estimating a population of just over 400 million in 2060.

The current population of United States is 331,008,036, based on projections of the latest United Nations data. The UN estimates the July 1, 2020 population at 331,002,651.

United States Growth Rate

United States Population 2020 (Live)

Name Population
New York City8,175,133
Los Angeles3,971,883
Chicago2,720,546
Brooklyn2,300,664
Houston2,296,224
Queens2,272,771
Philadelphia1,567,442
Phoenix1,563,025
Manhattan1,487,536
San Antonio1,469,845

United States Area and Population Density

By population, the United States of America is the 3rd largest country in the world, behind China (1.39 billion) and India (1.31 billion). Its most populous states are California with a population of 39.5 million and Texas with a population of 28.7 million, and its most populous city is New York City with a population of 8.4 million.

The largest state in the US by population is California, which is estimated to be home to just over 39.5 million people. If California were a country, it would be the 36th most populous in the world, slightly larger than Iraq and [Poland]. Its economy would be the eighth largest in the world, with roughly the same GDP as [Italy], a European country of 61 million people. Interestingly, although California is the largest state in the United States of America, it isn't the largest state in the Americas - that honor goes to [Brazil]'s state of [Sao Paulo] with over 45 million residents.

Largest Cities in the United States

The largest city by population and the most densely populated city in the US is New York City. The city's population is estimated at an impressive 8.4 million, which makes New York City larger than the second and third most populous cities in the United States, Los Angeles (4 million) and Chicago (2.7 million), combined.

By 1930, New York City was the largest city in the world, holding the title until 1980 when three worldwide cities surpassed its numbers. While New York City is no longer in the top 20 largest cities in the world by population, it is the world's second-largest city by GDP – its nominal GDP of $1.55 trillion puts it second to Tokyo, Japan.

Although no US cities compare in either size or density to New York City, Los Angeles in California is the second largest city in the nation with roughly half the population - around 4 million.

United States Population Density Map

Source:
Year Population Growth Rate Density (km²) Population Rank Density Rank
2020331,002,6510.59%36.193175
2019329,064,9170.60%35.973175
2018327,096,2650.62%35.763175
2017325,084,7560.64%35.543175
2016323,015,9950.67%35.313174
2015320,878,3100.76%35.083173
2010309,011,4750.93%33.783173
2005294,993,5110.93%32.253171
2000281,710,9091.22%30.803170
1995265,163,7451.01%28.993166
1990252,120,3090.95%27.563165
1985240,499,8250.94%26.293163
1980229,476,3540.93%25.093159
1975219,081,2510.90%23.953154
1970209,513,3410.96%22.903151
1965199,733,6761.36%21.833147
1960186,720,5711.69%20.413144
1955171,685,3361.57%18.773141
1950158,804,3950.00%17.363140

United States Population by Year (Historical)

Year Population Growth Rate Density (km²) Population Rank Density Rank
2020331,002,6510.59%36.193175
2025340,399,6010.56%37.213176
2030349,641,8760.54%38.223177
2035358,690,9990.51%39.213178
2040366,572,1540.44%40.073179
2045373,343,3480.37%40.813182
2050379,419,1020.32%41.484182
2055385,334,8610.31%42.124180
2060391,494,8960.32%42.804179
2065397,876,0930.32%43.504178
2070404,174,3990.32%44.184177
2075409,992,6320.29%44.824177
2080415,197,3990.25%45.394178
2085419,937,4400.23%45.914176
2090424,469,9160.21%46.404173
2095429,081,6580.22%46.914173

United States Population by Year (Projections)

United States Population Pyramid 2020

United States Population by Age

There are 255,369,678 adults in United States.

United States Population Pyramid

Unlike China and India, the United States population is expected to continue to grow throughout the century with no foreseeable decline. By 2067, the U.S. population is expected to surpass 400 million people.

The population growth in the United States is mainly attributed to high rates of immigration, which have decreased since 2016, and the natural increase (the difference between births and deaths).

The United States population grows on average about 0.9% every year. The population grew 0.60% in 2019; the lowest rate the U.S. has had in a century. This is because of a decrease in the number of total births over the year. Additionally, more post-World War II baby boomers are reaching old age, increasing the number of deaths.

Despite a decrease in the population growth rate in recent years, the population is still expected to grow continuously.

United States Population Growth

Formal censuses were not carried out during the colonial era, but records show that the colonial population grew from a shaky start of just 3,800 in 1610 to over 1 million in 1750. The population grew rapidly moving forward, and when the first official census was held in 1790 shortly after independence, the population had grown to nearly 4 million.

The United States census is held once every ten years, to count the number of people in the country along with gathering basic information, including age, sex, and race. The last census was held in 2010, and the next census will be held in 2020.

The information collected in the census is used for many purposes. The first purpose is to ensure that each seat in Congress represents roughly the same amount of people. National and State governments also use the information to plan services - for example, if they know that the population in an area is growing rapidly, they can plan to build more housing, schools, and hospitals. Every year, the Census Bureau also releases annual population estimates. Statistical modeling methods are applied to the most recent census data to give an up-to-date picture of how the population of America changes between censuses.

United States Population Projections

The population of the US continues to grow today, driven by a high level of immigration. The latest data from the Census Bureau shows that US population growth is running at between 0.7% and 0.9% per year. A 2015 Census Bureau Report suggests that growth will slow somewhat, and projects a 2060 population of 417 million, with the country crossing the 400 million threshold in 2051.

The United Nations projects a lower total, estimating a population of just over 400 million in 2060.

About United States

  1. US Census Bureau - US Population Clock
  2. World Happiness Report
  3. Pew Research Projected US Population by Race
  4. 10 Demographic Trends Shaping the US
  5. World Happiness Report Chapter 5
  6. Hispanic or Latino Origin by Race - American FactFinder B03002
  7. Detailed Languages Spoken at Home
  8. Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014 - 2060
  9. Five Key Findings on Religion in the U.S.
  10. UN World Population Prospects (2019 Revision) - United Nations population estimates and projections.

    <p>Total population: Estimated to be consistent with the 2010 census, which includes the population in the territory of the <a href='/countries/united-states-population'>United States</a> and United States citizens serving in the overseas armed forces; with official population estimates for 2015; and with estimates of the subsequent trends in fertility, mortality and international migration.</p>

  11. GeoNames Gazetteer